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The one that got away…

Not all artifacts of material culture are able to be readily digitized; there are a number of physical and intellectual hurdles to be crossed before an item makes it to the scanner. Each candidate item must evaluated to determine if it can by scanned without damage to the object, at the same time each item is examined to see if it is even possible to scan the item due to some physical characteristic such as the nature of a very tight binding, or a binding that obscures the text. Finally each item is examined to determine the copyright status. Here are some sample items from Villanova’s Special Collections that are candidates for scanning but due to a physical or intellectual impediment scanning is not possible:

Too fragile
october08-010.jpg

Too tightly Bound
october08-001.jpg

Too small (and too tightly bound)
october08-002.jpg

In copyright
october08-011.jpg
(This copy of the Secret Life of Salvador Dali has the author’s distinctive signature with hand-drawn illustrations).

Scrapbooks and albums present unique challenges in digitization. Component parts of these works often are physically and intellectually possible to scan, but display and presentation issues make it difficult to show the interrelationships between distinct objects. As well, objects contained within other objects often are physically connected, making opening and closing the parts and pages and scanning the front and back of each item problematic. Below are 4 images from two scrapbooks in Special Collections that highlight these difficulties. Images 1 and 2 are pages from a scrapbook created to show the related early historic preservation efforts in the creation of the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia and the U.S. National Park at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. This work contains bits of wood from buildings at both locations along with photographs, postcards, and pamphlets. Thus it is possible to scan all of the component parts of this work but showing the physical relationships of the component works in our existing digital library software is problematic. Another scrapbook from Special Collections, depicted in images 3 and 4, collects the hundreds of congratulatory letters (still contained in their stamped envelopes), and telegrams sent to Robert Maitland O’Reilly upon his appointment as Surgeon General of the United States on September 7, 1902, as well as the newspaper clippings announcing the appointment. Image 4 is one of these letters, authored and autographed by the then President of the United States – Theodore Roosevelt. The letters can be scanned individually but then they lose the relationship to the scrapbook as a collective whole. Some libraries have experimented with creating a distinctive scrapbook interface to present these works in a more complete and rich form; this is an area of future investigation and development for us at the digital library. For now these rare works must still be accessed in person.

[1]october08-003.jpg

[2]october08-004.jpg

[3]october08-0013.jpg

[4]october08-008.jpg

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3 Comments »

  1. Comment by Free Printable Scrapbook Pages — March 6, 2009 @ 2:08 pm

    I think Scrapbooking is really cool. It brings out peoples creativity and is also a fun thing to do. That’s why I made this Free Printable Scrapbook Pages blog to encourage more people into scrapbooking.

  2. Comment by Jenn — January 7, 2010 @ 3:45 pm

    I came across this website while looking for some scrapbooking ideas. What neat photos. I have never seen a scrapbook as old as the one you’ve shown! I enjoyed this article. Thank you!!

    Jenn

  3. Comment by Kristen — September 3, 2010 @ 7:12 pm

    I liked the scrapbook interface in picture [1]. It’s amazing how old scrapbooking is; it’s nice to see this. Thanks for posting this blog.

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Last Modified: October 31, 2008