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Learn the ten winners of the 2016 Falvey Memorial Library Community Survey

Congratulations to the following undergraduate and graduate students randomly selected to receive $25.00 on their Wildcards for participating in the 2016 Falvey Memorial Library Community Survey.  We appreciate their taking time to provide feedbackspring-falvey to help the Library keep moving forward.

  • Qiao Wei Huang
  • Julia Berger
  • Joshua Howard
  • Matthew Walker
  • Ogooluwa Laniya
  • Olivia Watson
  • Ethan Swain
  • Sebastian Araya
  • Kristina Hershey
  • Danielle O’Connor

Congratulations to all!

Although the results of the Survey won’t be available for a while, we also take this opportunity to thank all the students and faculty who participated in the recent Community Survey.


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Outstanding Faculty Research Award: Robert G. Traver, PhD, PE, WRE

a portrait of Dr. Robert G TraverToday, April 19, at 1:00 p.m. in the Idea Accelerator, Robert G. Traver, PhD, PE, WRE, professor of engineering, will highlight the extensive research that led him to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award.. Since 1981, Villanova University annually presents the Outstanding Faculty Research Award to a member of the faculty who demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in their research, scholarship, and contributions to their field.

Dr. Traver, a 20-year member of Villanova’s Water Resources and Environment Engineering Program, is a nationally recognized expert on stormwater management.  He founded the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership (VUSP) and as a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers External Review Panel (ERP), Dr. Traver played a significant role in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ investigation of the failure of the New Orleans Hurricane Protection System during Hurricane Katrina.

Dr. Traver’s talk is titled “Sustainable Stormwater at Villanova.” He will discuss the challenges of storm water sustainability in the built environment, and Villanova’s use of the campus for scholarship, teaching and as an agent for change.

This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Office of Research and Graduate Programs, is free and open to the public.

You can check out some of Dr. Traver’s research and more information about the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership (VUSP) in the resources below.

members of the VUSP team stand with umbrellas

Image via the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership Twitter, @vuspteam


Resources

Selected Publications via Dr. Traver’s Faculty Expert Page:

Emerson, C., Traver, R., (2008) “Multiyear and Seasonal Variation of Infiltration from Storm-Water Best Management Practices,” ASCE Journal of Irrigation and Drainage, (Sept./Oct.issue).
https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/vudl:179030

Traver, R., et al. (2007), “The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System: What Went Wrong and Why – A Report by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review Panel,” published by American Society of Civil Engineers.
http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/katrina/reports/ERPreport.pdf

Braga, A., Horst, M., Traver, R., “Temperature Effects on the Infiltration Rate Through an Infiltration Basin BMP,” Journal of Irrigation and Drainage, ASCE, (Nov./Dec. issue).
https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/vudl:179057

Kwiatkowki, M., Welker, A., Traver, R., Vanacore, M., Ladd, T., (2007) “Evaluation of an Infiltration Best Management Practice (BMP) Utilizing Pervious Concrete,” AWRA (Oct. issue).
https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/vudl:179000

View all Villanova Digital Library resources for Dr. Traver here.

Check out the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership page via the College of Engineering.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/19)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

IGR Brown Bag Lunch. 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in room 204. Questions? Contact: Brighid.Dwyer@villanova.edu


Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture featuring Robert Traver, PhD.
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in the Idea Outstanding Faculty Award promotional poster
Accelerator. Robert G. Traver, PhD, PE, WRE, professor of engineering, will highlight the extensive research that led him to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award at this public lecture. Since 1981, Villanova University annually presents the Outstanding Faculty Research Award to a member of the faculty who demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in their research, scholarship, and contributions to their field. Questions? Contact: Regina.Duffy@villanova.edu

Digital Scholarship Project Launch: Remembering WWI. 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. in room 204. Dr. Deb Boyer’s Fall 2015 graduate Digital History class delved into personal accounts of the First World War — including scrapbooks, postcards, and more — to bring the war to life and explore how individuals chose to remember such a momentous event. This event will provide an overview of the class and a walk-through of the site. Questions? Contact: Laura.Bang@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…Falvey Scholars promotional banner

Friday, April 22 at 9:00 a.m. room 205.

2016 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation & Reception Ceremony. This ceremony is one of the keynote events of EXPO ’16 week, which recognizes outstanding undergraduate research from across Villanova’s campus. At this event, award recipients will give short presentations on the content and findings of the research involved in the writing of the thesis or in the creation of the project report. Provost  Patrick G. Maggitti, PhD will open the event. The event will be emceed and awards will be presented by University Librarian Millicent Gaskell. Presentations will be followed with a closing by University President the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 CLAS, in which he will focus attention on the importance of both undergraduate and graduate research on campus.


Happening @ ‘Nova

Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

Celebrate Earth Day 2016: This week!
The University community will celebrate the 46th anniversary of Earth Day April 18-23 with programming focusing on growing greener communities. Activities include a viewing of the documentary This Changes Everything, campus tree tours, a sustainability fair and farmers market (with tie-dyeing, food tasting, raffles and vendors), keynote panel discussions and a day of service. Questions? Contact shawn.proctor@villanova.edu.

The Culture of Fear in a Suburban Space: A Protection of Privilege?: Today!
Join us Tuesday, April 19, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Falvey Memorial Library Room 204, for the final IGR Brown Bag of the semester. The topic will be Standing for Peace: The Culture of Fear in a Suburban Space: A Protection of Privilege? Come late or leave early as needed. Bring your lunch and thoughts, snacks will be provided.Questions? Contact brighid.dwyer@villanova.edu.

Earth Week: Campus Tree Tours: April 19 and 20
Spring is here, and the cherry trees are blooming. Enjoy a walk around campus, while learning about tree species, care and maintenance. Two different tree tours will be held. First tour is on Tuesday, April 19 at 1 p.m. and the second on Wednesday, April 20, 10 a.m. For both tours meet at Corr Hall arch. Questions? Contact liesel.schwarz@villanova.edu.


QUOTE OF THE DAY

On this day in 1897, the first Boston Marathon was held. Yesterday was Marathon Monday, and you can view the leader boards from yesterday’s 2016 Marathon right here. What sparked the creation of the now ever-popular Boston Marathon? That would be the very first modern Olympics, held in Athens, Greece just the year before in 1896. Inspired by the marathon run in the first modern Olympics, John Graham — a member of the Boston Athletic Association and a U.S. Olympic team manager — wanted to put a long race right in the streets of Boston. Only 10 people finished the first Boston Marathon–but only 15 people ran it to begin with! About 30,000 runners participated in yesterday’s iconic run. Quite a growth spurt! You can check out our holdings on marathon running here.

a pair of green and black running sneakers

“If you want to run, run a mile. If you want to experience a different life, run a marathon.” – Emil Zatopek


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Villanova Faculty Discuss Scholarly Social Networks

ACADEMICSOCNET

As scholarly social networks increasingly rise to the top of searches for academic literature on the free web, Falvey Memorial Library, on Wednesday, March 16, convened a discussion group of faculty who are active on ResearchGate, Academia.edu and Social Science Research Network. Faculty from the School of Business, Colleges of Nursing, Engineering, and Liberal Arts and Sciences were represented as well as liaison librarians and technologists. The discussion—introduced by way of a brief presentation (imbedded below) defining scholarly social networks, outlining their history, features and controversial practices and policies—quickly took off as faculty shared their reasons for joining these networks and also their concerns about using them.

RS11581_DSC_4458-scrOne professor commented “They’re a good way to get your name out there.” A consensus quickly coalesced around the notion that academic social networks are useful for disseminating research, both within a field and to broader audiences. Other reasons cited for participation in scholarly social networks include keeping up with peers’ research output, staying current with research trends and getting metrics, such as counts for article views or downloads to gauge research impact as alternatives to citation counts. Google Scholar Profiles was mentioned as an alternative or as adjunct to the tracking of citation activity with beneficial and easy-to-set privacy settings. An engineering faculty member observed that funding agencies favorably notice academic social network participation.

RS11579_DSC_4456-scrFaculty also noted that the benefit of scholarly social networks “depends on where you are in your career.” Early career scholars who are building their research networks reap greater benefits than well-established researchers. One faculty member found it simply “impossible to keep up with Researchgate.” Researchgate solicits participation in questions forums. Faculty expressed concern about copyright violations because the onus for securing copyright permissions rests on the participant, not on the online network. Librarians questioned the sustainability of Academia.edu and Researchgate due to their heavy reliance on venture capital and seemingly narrow advertising appeal.

In the end, the faculty expressed enthusiasm about ways the University could fulfill the roles academic social networks currently fill. For some, the networks serve as an unofficial personal website. In the past, with varying levels of commitment, the University encouraged researchers to build personal websites by offering training and access. Librarians in particular noticed that academic social networks may be achieving some of the functions of open access journal publishing and open access institutional repositories. Villanova has a faculty bibliography, but not an institutional repository. Several attendees shared their successes with using other social media such as Twitter for disseminating their research findings; as a result faculty expressed spirited agreement that workshops on social media promotion are sorely needed.

Look for future Academic Integration hosted faculty discussions on the intersection of publishing, research and scholarly communication.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/18)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

2016 Open Mic Reading. 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Class of 2016 Creative Writing Contestants, other students and members of the University community will share original work and favorite poems, ranging from the humorous to the thought-provoking to the sublime.  Whether you have a poem or a creative-writing excerpt you’d like to share or you just want to listen, the Department of English and Falvey Memorial Library invite you to enjoy this entertaining and memorable celebration of poetry and creative writing. alan.drew@villanova.edu


SAVE THE DATE…

TOMORROW! Outstanding Faculty Research Award Lecture featuring Robert Traver, PhD. 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in the Idea Accelerator. Robert G. Traver, PhD, PE, WRE, professor of engineering, will highlight the extensive research that led him to win the coveted Outstanding Faculty Research Award. Since 1981, Villanova University annually presents the Outstanding Faculty Research Award to a member of the faculty who demonstrates the highest standards of excellence in their research, scholarship, and contributions to their field. Light refreshments will be served at this ACS approved event.


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

“The Self as Software: Transcending and Enhancing the Brain”: Today!
Professor Susan Schneider of The University of Connecticut will present “The Self as Software: Transcending and Enhancing the Brain,” Monday, April 18, 4:30 p.m., Driscoll Hall, room 134. This event is cosponsored by Cognitive Science, Computing Sciences, and Philosophy. All are Welcome! Questions? Contact: betsy.fillippo@villanova.edu

Celebrate Earth Day 2016: This week!
The University community will celebrate the 46th anniversary of Earth Day April 18-23 with programming focusing on growing greener communities. Activities include a viewing of the documentary This Changes Everything, campus tree tours, a sustainability fair and farmers market (with tie-dyeing, food tasting, raffles and vendors), keynote panel discussions and a day of service. Questions? Contact: shawn.proctor@villanova.edu

The Culture of Fear in a Suburban Space: A Protection of Privilege?: 4/19
Join us Tuesday, April 19, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Falvey 204, for the final IGR Brown Bag of the semester. The topic will be Standing for Peace: The Culture of Fear in a Suburban Space: A Protection of Privilege? During the first 20 minutes Professor Carol Anthony (Center for Peace & Justice) will provide remarks about the culture of fear and the connections to privilege and suburban spaces. The remaining time will be available for conversation about this topic. Come late or leave early as needed. Bring your lunch and thoughts, snacks will be provided. Questions? Contact: brighid.dwyer@villanova.edu


This week in Villanova history. “Core curriculum sparks controversy …” is a front page headline in The Villanovan, Vol. 66, No. 20 (April 19, 1991). The core curriculum had not been evaluated since 1972 and the proposed new  “core curriculum is the focus of much debate among the faculty.” Science requirement would be increased to three course, a fine arts requirement would be added, statistics would be a mandatory requirement for mathematics and the religious studies, philosophy and English requirements would be reduced from three courses to two each.

Bound volumes of the Villanovan are housed in the University Archives.


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Happy birthday to Maria Bello, film actress and Villanovan, who turns 49 today! Bello was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania, is a graduate of Archbishop John Carroll High School in Radnor, and was a political science major here at Villanova (A&S ’89). You can read a Villanova feature on Bello here. We have two of Maria Bello’s film in our stacks: A History of Violence and The Company Men.

actress maria bello

“I went to Villanova with plans to go to law school afterward. In college, before I ever thought of becoming an actress, I was studying to be a human-rights attorney… During my junior year, I took an acting class. I had to do a monologue, so I picked this song by Bob Dylan about a homeless man who experiences social injustice, and I began to realize the transformative power of art…I could choose art to tell stories that would move people to think.”
– Maria Bello

image via gdcgraphics


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Poetry in the Kitchen

In poetry or prose, the word “marrow” can be used as a literary device to signify one’s existence, life or energy. For example, Henry David Thoreau uses marrow in his book, Walden, to convey his pursuit of the simple and essential truth of life.

“I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms.”

In the case of our recipe today, marrow is the soft, fatty substance found inside the round bones of veal shanks that adds a richness to the recipe for Osso Buco, or veal stew. I used Julia Child’s recipe, which is a Provençal version that can be found in the first edition (1970) of her cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

Julia Child cookbookSome years ago, Falvey’s copy was being withdrawn from the collection after years of heavy use by library patrons. I was more than happy to take it home, even in its damaged condition. It wasn’t only the recipes that interested me, but Child’s practical advice on selecting high-quality ingredients and kitchen tools.

Many of the recipes and the way Child describes her methods remind me of the days I spent as a child watching my Belgian grandparents cook for us at home. As children, we were also sometimes allowed to sit quietly in the kitchens of their wealthy employers while they prepared meals and desserts.

It’s easy for me to romanticize those days, running around without a care in the world, gathering fallen apples in the grass, watching my grandmother in the vegetable garden, playing on the cool, slate patio with pots and pans, or spinning around outside with a wire mesh basket of freshly washed lettuce. When I look back, there is poetry in those memories. Maybe that is what inspires me to cook.

As I searched for poets who found similar inspiration in food or in memories of family meals, I remembered a favorite poem, “Osso Buco,” by Billy Collins. I was lucky to have seen him in person years ago at the Agnes Irwin school near Villanova University. An excerpt of Collins’ poem follows the recipe and photos of my foray into the realm of Julia Child.

I’m going to attempt to simplify what Child wrote in her book, which can seem confusing as she directs you to follow steps 1 & 2 of a “Master Recipe” on earlier pages before having you continue with Osso Buco.

You may want to order the veal shanks a few days or a week in advance as butchers and grocery stores don’t always have them in ready supply.

Osso Buco

Two veal hind shanks 1 ½ inches thick, tied with butcher string

Salt & pepper (for seasoning veal)

½ cup flour (for dredging veal) on a dinner plate

osso buco ingredients1 cup sliced yellow onion

3-4 tbsp. olive oil for cooking

½ cup dry white wine

½ cup chicken stock or broth

½ tsp. oregano

1 bay leaf

2 cloves garlic, smashed

2-3 small Roma tomatoes, seeded, peeled, and roughly chopped

1 orange

1 lemon

Recipe serves two and can easily be doubled.

Preheat oven to 325°

Season veal shanks with salt & pepper and then dredge in flour. Shake off excess. Heat 1-2 tbsp. olive oil in large heavy frying pan on moderate to high heat on stove. Once oil is hot, but not smoking, place veal in pan and brown on both sides, then set veal aside.

Heat 1-2 tbsp. olive oil in heavy oven-proof dutch oven on moderate heat on stove. Add onions and cook until soft, then raise heat and brown lightly. Add veal to onions in dutch oven.

Discard oil from frying pan and add white wine to deglaze the pan. Scrape up any bits while deglazing and pour the contents of frying pan into the dutch oven with veal and onions.

Stir in chicken stock, herbs, garlic, and tomatoes. Bring to a slow simmer.

Using a vegetable peeler, carefully cut only the zests from half or 2/3 of the orange and half or 2/3 of the lemon. Be careful to cut only the zest, the outer orange or yellow peel, and not the white, bitter pith underneath. Cut the pieces of zest into julienne (very thin) strips.

Add the zest strips to the veal and vegetable mixture in the dutch oven. Cover and place in preheated oven for 1 to 1 ¼ hour. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed.

Serve with risotto or pasta.

Osso Buco

 

The following excerpt is from Billy Collins’ poem, “Osso Buco.” The full poem can be found in his book, Sailing Alone Around the Room, or in the journal Poetry, which is available online through JSTOR (Villanova University credentials required).

Osso Buco

I love the sound of the bone against the plate
and the fortress-like look of it
lying before me in a moat of risotto,
the meat soft as the leg of an angel
who has lived a purely airborne existence.
And best of all, the secret marrow,
the invaded privacy of the animal
prised out with a knife and swallowed down
with cold, exhilarating wine.
I am swaying now in the hour after dinner,
a citizen tilted back on his chair,
a creature with a full stomach —

More Food-infused Poems:

Stew Meat Blues” (unknown author, Columbia Granger’s World of Poetry online)

American Cooking” (from the book Natural Trouble by Scott Hightower)

Once Upon a Time” (A Broadside in the Villanova Digital Library)

Food for Poets” (full text in Eighteenth Century Collections Online)

Poetry Collections Featuring Food:

Appetite: Food as Metaphor.

The Milk of Almonds: Italian American Women Writers on Food and Culture.

Roman Food Poems.

 


Food blog by Luisa Cywinski, writer on the Communication & Service Promotion team and head of the Access Services team.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (4/15)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club Meeting. 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather to play video games in a safe and fun environment. The VEEC is always accepting new members. Open to all. Come join in for games and fun. Questions? Contact: Matthew Pasquale <mpasqua7@villanova.edu>


SAVE THE DATE…
2016 Open Mic Event. 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Class of 2016 Creative Writing Contestants, other students and members of the University community will share original work and favorite poems, ranging from the humorous to the thought-provoking to the sublime.  Whether you have a poem or a creative-writing excerpt you’d like to share or you just want to listen, the Department of English and Falvey Memorial Library invite you to enjoy this entertaining and memorable celebration of poetry and creative writing. Questions? Contact: Alan.Drew@Villanova.edu


Happening @ ‘Nova

Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

Safety Day hosted by the Department of Chemistry: Today!
The Department of Chemistry will be hosting a Safety Day event April 15, 2:30-4:30 p.m., Mendel Hall 213, including a keynote speaker and a number of breakout sessions on various aspects of laboratory safety. Questions? Contact: Melisssa.palmarino@villanova.edu

Pennsylvania Pipelines: Assessing the Infrastructure Task Force Report: Today!
In May 2015 Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf established the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Task Force to address the Commonwealth’s pipeline system, which produced its first official report in February. The 2016 Villanova Environmental Law Journal Blank Rome LLP Symposium—Pennsylvania Pipelines: Assessing the Infrastructure Task Force Report—will discuss the future of Pennsylvania’s pipeline infrastructure and the broader issues relating to the Task Force report. The event takes place on Friday, April 15, 9 a.m.–12:30 p.m., in room 101 at the Law School.  Questions? Contact: Chelsea.gerrard@villanova.edu

2016 Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish Honor Society) Induction: Today!
The Department of Romance Languages’ 2016 Sigma Delta Pi Induction Ceremony will take place on Friday, April 15, 5—7 p.m., in St. Augustine Center 300. Our guest speaker is Dr. Cristina Soriano of Villanova University, who will give a talk on the “Libros y Colonización en la América Española.” We hope you will join us for the lecture and to celebrate the new Sigma Delta Pi members! Questions? Contact: Adriano.duque@villanova.edu


NEW MEDIA NEWS

emerging adultThis book might not be what a parent of teen-aged children is looking for as a guide to raising responsible adults. It’s geared more toward those interested in the field of developmental psychology. The Oxford Handbook of Emerging Adulthood explores how “in recent decades, the lives of people in their late teens and twenties have changed so dramatically that a new stage of life has developed…Jeffrey Jensen Arnett identified this period, coining it “emerging adulthood,” and he distinguished it from both the adolescence that precedes it and the young adulthood that comes in its wake.”

 


This week in Villanova history. In the April 12, 1991, Villanovan, one of the front page stories had the headline, “Arts building construction relocates athletic facilities.” The arts building is what is now called SAC, the St. Augustine Center. The story notes that construction began in January and eight tennis courts and sixteen basketball courts were removed: “with this sudden loss of recreational space, the question of whether or not the University has sufficient athletic facilities for student use has been raised.” However, there are now a number of tennis courts located near the new parking facility.

Bound volumes of The Villanovan are housed in the University Archives.


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Happy birthday to Emma Watson, who turns 26 today. Watson rose to stardom playing Hermione Granger in the films based on J.K. Rowling’s hit series Harry Potter. But she’s also shined in The Perks of Being a Wallflower and stars as Belle in the upcoming 2017 film Beauty and the Beast. You can read Harry Potter and The Perks of Being a Wallflower by borrowing them from our stacks today!

emma watson

“But it’s a journey and the sad thing is you only learn from experience, so as much as someone can tell you things, you have to go out there and make your own mistakes in order to learn.” – Emma Watson

Photo via AHD Wallpaper


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‘Cat in the Stacks: “Reach as High as You Can” Day

CAT-STAX4

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Let’s try something together.

Put your hand in the air.

Seriously, do it. No one’s judging you.

Okay, now reach a little higher.

A little higher.

Higher still.

Now go to your highest.

Done? Perhaps you think so. Now really reach.

You thought you were at your highest, but you still had more to go–you thought you were on E but you still had gas in the tank. Think you can apply this to your life? Of course you can.

So today is apparently Reach as High as You Can Day, a national holiday which has no traceable origins and very well might be an internet creation that caught fire one time and made it onto National Day wikis to be forever embroidered upon the calendar tapestry of the world wide web. That being said, I think it’s an awesome designation for a day (and a fair lot better than Ex-Spouse Day, which it also happens to be, but certainly on par with the awesomeness of National Dolphin Day–another April 14 contender).

two dolphins swimming

You could take the day literally and reach high–do yoga, stretch, dance with your arms in the air. Or you can take it a little more figuratively and use the exercise above as a teachable moment. How often do you feel close to giving up? How often do you feel like you’ve given your all and you can’t possibly dig any deeper? In those moments, you have more in your tank than you would ever believe.

With finals coming up, we’re all dragging. But we’ve been here before–if not in college, then in life–and we know we have what it takes. As my high school coach used to say, “What you keep, you lose forever.” When you think you’re at wit’s end, you’re usually not. Dig in.

And come to the Library–that’s how your brain knows it’s go-time!


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Meet the Sweet Madness Winner!


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We have one more bit of championship news to share – the winner of Falvey Memorial Library’s Sweet Madness contest! Sorry not sorry for the sounds of rebounds you may have heard if you were anywhere near our front desk during March Madness! Patrons were shooting free throws for Tootsie Pops and entries to win that dorm essential: a mini basketball hoop. Chosen randomly for the win is sophomore Mauricio Perez, an economics major from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mauricio reports that he’s excited to hang the new hoop in his dorm because the one he used to have fell prey to a backboard-swaying, game-delaying, get-out-of-the-waying dunk. (Daryl Dawkins’ words, not his. But it must have been legendary.) Congratulations!!


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Dig Deeper: Asali Solomon, author of “Disgruntled”

Asali SolomonThe Africana Studies Program in conjunction with Villanova University’s 18th Annual Literary Festival presents the Ida B. Wells Lecture featuring author Asali Solomon, PhD today, Thursday April 14, at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner of Falvey Memorial Library. Dr. Solomon, one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers, will be giving a reading and talk. 

Dr. Solomon is the author of the novel Disgruntled.  She received a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award for her first book, a story collection entitled Get Down. The volume was also a finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. In 2007 she was named one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35.” Dr. Solomon teaches English at Haverford College. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband and two sons.

Dr. Solomon will be reading from Disgruntled today. This event, co-sponsored by Falvey Memorial Library and the Department of English, is free and open to the public. 

To learn more about Dr. Solomon and her works, check out the resources below, selected by team leader of Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


cover of asali solomon's short story collection Get DownDig Deeper

Get Down

NPR Author Interview, Novelist’s ‘Disgruntled’ Heroine Is Drawn From Her Own Childhood”

http://www.asalisolomon.com/

A 2012 reading by Dr. Solomon

 

 

 

 


Links curated by Sarah Wingo, team leader – Humanities II, subject librarian for English, literature and theatre.


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Last Modified: April 14, 2016