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Valentine’s Day Geekology courtesy of your library!

A vintage Valentine

Valentine’s Day, or is it St. Valentine’s Day? Either way, on February 14 each year the holiday is celebrated. Cards, flowers, candy and other gifts are given to sweethearts. Hearts and cupids are popular Valentine’s Day images.

How did this holiday (not a national holiday, but nevertheless widely observed, here and elsewhere) evolve?

Three St. Valentines are mentioned in early martyrologies; each saint’s feast day was February 14. The first St. Valentine lived during the reign (41-54 AD) of the Roman Emperor Claudius and was beheaded on February 14, 270. Buried on the Flaminian Way, his remains (relics) were transferred to St. Praxedes Church. A second St. Valentine, the Bishop of Interamna (now Terni), was martyred during the reign (268-270) of Emperor Claudius II Gothicus. A third St. Valentine, about whom almost nothing is known, was martyred in Africa. The Roman Catholic Church celebrated St. Valentine’s feast day on February 14 until 1969. That year the Church removed St. Valentine from the General Roman Calendar; his feast day is now observed in local calendars although he is still considered a saint.

How did St. Valentine’s (or the Saints Valentines’) Day become associated with a holiday celebrating romantic or courtly love? In England and France during the Middle Ages many people believed that birds began to mate on February 14. This association of Valentine’s Day and the mating of birds can be seen in the work of the medieval English poet, Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1340-1400). In Chaucer’s “The Parliment of Fowles,” he mentions Cupid and Venus and says, “You know that on Saint Valentine’s Day … You come to choose … Your mates [referring to fowls]” From these ideas Valentine’s Day became associated with lovers and the exchanging of letters, gifts or other tokens.

William Saunders, History of St. Valentine, explains, “While it seems that the exchange of ‘valentines’ is more the result of secular custom rather than the memory of St. Valentine … there is a Christian message that should be remembered. The love of our Lord … is a sacrificial, self-less, and unconditional love. Such is the love that each Christian is called to express in his own life, for God and neighbor.”

In that spirit, this writer is including an untitled poem from Falvey’s Digital Library; it was written by Joseph McGarrity (1874-1940), an Irish American businessman who immigrated in 1890.

A thousand thanks to the King of Kings
For all the blessings St Valentine brings
I can boast of enjoying the pleasures of life
Two innocent babies and the love of a wife
A home that is happy and health to enjoy
With hope for the future both boyant [sic] and bright
And cares of each day put away for the night
With so many good things I’ve got reason to say
May the world be as happy on Vale[tine’s] day

Feby 12 – 1814

Dig Deeper:

The Golden Legend (1973, originally written 13th C.) Jacobus de Voragine. Trans. by Granger Ryan and Helmut Ripperger.

The Lives of the Saints. February (1872)  Rev. S. Baring-Gould.

Chaucer and the Cult of Saint Valentine (1986) Henry Ansgar Kelly.

Valentine’s Day:  A Musical Drama in Two Acts(1776) William Heard.

Valentine’s Day: Women Against Men: Stories of Revenge  (2000)

Valentines (2008) Ted Kooser.

History of St. Valentine” William Saunders.

The Origins of St.Valentine’s Day

 


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‘Caturday: There’s a chapel in the pines…waiting for us, around the bend…

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We suppose we could have gone with These Boots Are Made for Walking as a suitable lyrical caption for this 50-year old photo of a lovesick Wildcat couple gazing across a snowy Mendel Field.

But it’s Valentine’s Weekend and we’re in the mood for love!

So instead, we’re going to imagine that it’s the other #1 hit from February 1966 – Lou Christie’s Lightin’ Strikes – that’s the soundtrack in the heads of these cooing ‘Cats. Admittedly, its lyrics are primarily about a guy not quite ready to settle down, but there really is a chapel there! And it is just around the bend from these two and surrounded by what probably is a dozen pines or so.

We just have to head to the Digital Library’s helpful  Arboreana to make sure.  :-)

Scanned from the 1966 Belle Air.


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Foto Friday: Middle Man

Middle Man ed

Spread love everywhere you go.
Let no one ever come to you without leaving happier.
Mother Teresa

The full issue of this and other Comfort magazines can be viewed in the Falvey Digital Library.

Laura Hutelmyer is the photography coordinator for the Communication and Service Promotion Team and Special Acquisitions Coordinator in Resource Management


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/12)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club (VEEC) 2:30-4:30 p.m. in the first-floor lounge. The VEEC is a social club, focused on recreation and relaxation. Participants gather to play video games in a safe and fun environment. The VEEC is always accepting new members. Open to all. Come join in for games and fun. Questions? Contact: Matthew Pasquale 

PS3-controller-300x220


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award: 2/15
The Center for Peace and Justice Education is pleased to announce General Roméo Dallaire as the 2015 Adela Dwyer/St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award recipient. His lecture “Are All Humans Human?” will be held Monday, Feb. 15, 5 p.m., Villanova room. General Dallaire commanded the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Rwanda prior to and during the 1994 genocide. His courage and leadership during this ill-fated mission have earned him recognition, affection, and admiration from around the globe. In recent years he has turned his attention to the use of child soldiers. General Dallaire will receive the 2015 Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award for his work to raise awareness about and eradicate the use of children as weapons of war. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher

Jummah (Muslim) Prayer: Fridays on Campus
Jummah is a congregational prayer that Muslims hold on Friday afternoons; beginning this semester, prayers will take place weekly on campus. Muslims and non-Muslims are welcome to attend. Co-sponsored by the Muslim Student Association and Campus Ministry. Questions? Contact: Julia Sheetz

Annual Faith and Reason Lecture: 2/16
The Department of Humanities Presents, the 2016 Faith and Reason Lecture, titled “By the Renewal Of Your Mind: How to Practice Your Education in Everyday Life.” Speaker: Dr. Kevin Hughes, Chair, Department of Humanities; Associate Professor, Department of Theology. The event will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m. in Bartley Hall, room 1011 Refreshments will be provided after the lecture in the Bartley Atrium. Questions? Contact: Luisa Ruggieri


excellent daughtersNEW MEDIA NEWS

The author of Excellent Daughters, Katherine Zoepf, has “lived in or traveled throughout the Arab world, reporting on the lives of women, whose role in the region has never been more in flux. Only a generation ago, female adolescence as we know it in the West did not exist in the Middle East. There were only children and married women. Today, young Arab women outnumber men in universities, and a few are beginning to face down religious and social tradition in order to live independently, to delay marriage, and to pursue professional goals.” How does this compare to the experience of young women in the United States or in Third World countries?


This Week in Villanova History. A wish for spring and looking towards Valentine’s Day, this selection seemed appropriate.

 “Arbutus,” a poem by John I. Whelen, ’95 [1895]. “A sprig of the trailing arbutus/Its flower a tint of the rose;/Sweet harbinger of the springtime,/Growing beneath the snows./ … I bring thee the blossom beloved,/That the blush of its bloom may impart/The story of fondest affection/I hold for thee deep in my heart;/ … Forever my love will endure. …” The Villanova Monthly, Vol.V, No. 2 (Feb. 1897), p. 77. Bound volumes are housed in the University Archives.


GRAVITATIONAL WAVES DETECTED!

Did you hear the big astronomy news? Scientists and astronomers have officially detected gravitational waves: “Einstein in 1916 proposed the existence of gravitational waves as an outgrowth of his ground-breaking general theory of relativity, which depicted gravity as a distortion of space and time triggered by the presence of matter. Until now scientists had found only indirect evidence of their existence, beginning in the 1970s” [source – read more!]. The discovery, which has researchers absolutely excited, should have a big impact on how us wee humans study the universe from here on out. Be sure to read up on the discovery – there are colliding black holes and everything! Move over, J.J. Abrams.

distant galaxies like snowflakes on a black sheet via hubble


QUOTE OF THE DAY
Black History Month

Bessie Coleman (1892-1926) was an American civil aviator who stopped at nothing to achieve her dream of piloting. While Coleman was working in a barbershop in Chicago, she heard many stories about flying in WWI from her veteran patrons. Unfortunately, at the time, no American flight school would accept Coleman, and not even black U.S. aviators would train her. Determined to follow through with her dream to fly, Coleman learned French and went to Paris to learn to pilot. She became the first African American female pilot and the first Native American woman to hold an aviation license. She was also the first woman of African American and Native American heritage to obtain an international aviation license.

bessie coleman

“I refused to take no for an answer.” – Bessie Coleman


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/11)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…
TORDAYCRXsm

2016 Literary Festival featuring Daniel Torday. 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Reading and talk given by Daniel Torday, one of the Literary Festival’s featured speakers. Daniel Torday is the author of the novel The Last Flight of Poxl West, a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, and an Amazon.com Best Debuts of 2015. His novella,The Sensualist, won the 2012 National Jewish Book Award for debut fiction. Torday’s stories and essays have appeared in Esquire Magazine, n+1, The New York Times, The Paris Review Daily and Tin House. A former editor at Esquire, Torday serves as an editor at The Kenyon Review. He is Director of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College. At the event, Torday will read from his most recent novel The Last Flight of Poxl West. Questions? Contact: Alan Drew

Digital Scholarship Brown Bag Conversation. 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in room 205. Digital scholarship (formerly ‘digital humanities’) is one of the most prominent trends in the humanities and social sciences in recent years. What is it exactly, and what does it mean for research and teaching at Villanova? Bring your lunch and your ideas for a conversation with Library staff about the state of the art of digital scholarship on campus. Coffee and tea will be provided. Drop in and out anytime. Questions? Contact: Nik Fogle


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

Residence Life Blood Drive: Today!
There is currently a critical shortage of blood products and you can help out by donating on Thursday, Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., in the West Lounge of Dougherty Hall. Make your appointment today at www.redcrossblood.org Sponsor Code: villanovareslife
Questions? Contact: Jennifer Liberato

Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award: 2/15
The Center for Peace and Justice Education is pleased to announce General Roméo Dallaire as the 2015 Adela Dwyer/St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award recipient. His lecture “Are All Humans Human?” will be held Monday, Feb. 15, 5 p.m., Villanova room. General Dallaire commanded the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Rwanda prior to and during the 1994 genocide. His courage and leadership during this ill-fated mission have earned him recognition, affection, and admiration from around the globe. In recent years he has turned his attention to the use of child soldiers. General Dallaire will receive the 2015 Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award for his work to raise awareness about and eradicate the use of children as weapons of war. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher

Centering Prayer – Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays
Our gathering times for the spring semester are Wednesdays 8:30-9 a.m. & Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:45-1:15 p.m. in the St. Rita Hall Community Room. Centering prayer is space for quiet, meditative prayer that cultivates a place of rest and attentive presence in the midst of our busy and distracted lives. We gather in a small group and sit quietly together. No previous experience with centering prayer or meditation is necessary. Questions? Contact: John P. Edwards


interpreting foodtea culture in chinaBOOKENDS

It might be hard to decide which book you want to browse first, Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites or The Rise of Tea Culture in China. As the publisher (of both books) notes, “food is such a friendly topic that it’s often thought of as a “hook” for engaging visitors to museums and historic sites.” Interpreting Food by Michelle Moon certainly hooked us into taking a second look. And tea connoisseurs might be drawn to the book by Bret Hinsch that dispels stereotypes about the culture and meaning of drinking tea in China. Either book you choose could whet your appetite for the other.


#TBT

Feelin’ springtime vibes yet? Check out our throwback pic from the 1958 Villanova Yearbook. Students enjoyed a lively  game of horseshoes in Mendel Field.

1958 Villanova yearbook, horeshoe game, Mendel field

Caption from the 1958 Villanova University yearbook, Mendel field, horeshoe game


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006) was an American author who challenged the status quo in the science fiction writers’ world as a female and as an African American. Her novels engaged “elements of science fiction and African American spiritualism” [source]. She was the first science fiction writer to receive the MacAuthor Fellowship, and received many Hugo and Nebula awards. You can find Butler’s novels, including Kindred, Parable of the Sower, Dawn: Xenogenesis, and Fledging, among other writings, in our collection.

Octavia E. Butler with science fiction book shelf

“Tolerance, like any aspect of peace, is forever a work in progress, never completed, and, if we’re as intelligent as we like to think we are, never abandoned.” – Octavia E. Butler

Photograph by Joshua Trujillo/AP


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The Curious ‘Cat: What is your favorite St. Valentine’s Day story or memory?

Curious 'Cat - image

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What is your favorite St. Valentine’s Day story or memory?”

Elizabeth O’Brien—“My mom mailed me a package, and it’s my first year away from home, so I hope this will be it.”

RS11279_DSC_0595-scrAlex Pereira—“getting candy when you were younger … go to school, they had the candy bags and stuff that you’d get. I always looked forward to that.”

 

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Jacqueline Townshend—“A few years ago my parents and I were in Seattle, and we all went out, got dinner and ate lots of cupcakes.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RS11285_DSC_0601-scrAdam A. Butchy—“This may be a little childish, but part of my favorite thing growing up was making those little ridiculous Valentine’s Day cards that you used to give out to people in grade school. Everybody would have a little cubby, and you would write it and give everybody a little candy and a card. It was a nice way to show who you were friends with and just being nice to everyone in class.”

 

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Jenna Coyne—“Every year I get a bunch of chocolates and candy, little presents from my parents. That’s probably my favorite one.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Messina—“One year I went to an event when I was an undergrad, playing beer games or something.”


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/10)

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SAVE THE DATE…

Tomorrow! Digital Scholarship Brown Bag Conversation. 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in room 205. Digital scholarship (formerly ‘digital humanities’) is one of the most prominent trends in the humanities and social sciences in recent years. What is it exactly, and what does it mean for research and teaching at Villanova? Bring your lunch and your ideas for a conversation with Library staff about the state of the art of digital scholarship on campus. Coffee and tea will be provided. Drop in and out anytime. Questions? Contact: Nik Fogle


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

CFAP Society Philadelphia Suburban Special Event: Today!
Wednesday, Feb. 10 5 p.m. VSB’s Finance Department is partnering with CFA Society Philadelphia for a suburban special event – “The Evolving Role of Large Institutional Investors in Reshaping Modem Markets”. Come to hear our panel of experts debate the impact that large institutional investors have on the debt and equity marketplaces. Questions? Contact: Angela Layne

Residence Life Blood Drive: 2/11
There is currently a critical shortage of blood products and you can help out by donating on Thursday, Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., in the West Lounge of Dougherty Hall. Make your appointment today at www.redcrossblood.org Sponsor Code: villanovareslife
Questions? Contact: Jennifer Liberato

Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award: 2/15
The Center for Peace and Justice Education is pleased to announce General Roméo Dallaire as the 2015 Adela Dwyer/St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award recipient. His lecture “Are All Humans Human?” will be held Monday, Feb. 15, 5 p.m., Villanova room. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher

 


chappieNEW MEDIA NEWS

In the near future, crime is patrolled by an oppressive mechanized police force. But now, the people are fighting back. When one police droid, Chappie, is stolen and given new programming, he becomes the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself. As powerful, destructive forces start to see Chappie as a danger to mankind and order, they will stop at nothing to maintain the status quo and ensure that Chappie is the last of his kind.

 


This Week in Villanova History. Actually, it is once again “this month,” but given the recent weather, this clipping seems appropriate. “Delightful Outing:  Rev. Father Geraghty, OSA, rector of the Mission band, prior to setting out on an extended missionary tour, kindly tendered the novices a very enjoyable sleigh ride, followed by a dainty supper…” The group traveled in a sleigh named “Bryn Mawr,” pulled by four horses, and it took them three hours to reach the Indian Rock Hotel in Fairmount Park where they ate supper. They returned to Villanova after riding through Conshohocken. The Villanova Monthly, Vol.V, No. 2 (Feb. 1897), p. 93. Bound volumes are housed is the University Archives.

Geraghty Hall is named for the Rev. Martin J. Geraghty (1867-1914), OSA, DD, who served as the Provincial for three terms and raised funds for the construction of the current St. Rita Hall.


QUOTE OF THE DAY

Ava DuVernay, born in Long Beach, California in 1972, became the first African American female director to be nominated for a Golden Globe in 2015. She is famous for her film Selma, which focuses on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s efforts in equal voting rights, particularly highlighting the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. In addition to her Golden Globe nomination for Best Director, DuVernay also became the first African American female director to have a film nominated for an Academy Award when Selma was nominated for Best Picture.

Ava Duvernay

“If you’re doing something outside of dominant culture, there’s not an easy place for you. You will have to do it yourself.” – Ava DuVernay


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/9)

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TODAY IN THE LIBRARY…

Phi Sigma Pi Table Fundraiser: Win a Bae Basket for Valentine’s Day! First floor entrance area from 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Questions? Contact: Lauren Kloss

Agape Latte. 8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. in the first-floor lounge. Questions? Contact: Alicia Dunphy-Culp


SAVE THE DATE…TORDAYCRXsm

2016 Literary Festival featuring Daniel Torday. Thursday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m. in Speakers’ Corner. Daniel Torday is the author of the novel The Last Flight of Poxl West, a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, and an Amazon.com Best Debuts of 2015. His novella,The Sensualist, won the 2012 National Jewish Book Award for debut fiction. Torday’s stories and essays have appeared in Esquire Magazine, n+1, The New York Times, The Paris Review Daily and Tin House. A former editor at Esquire, Torday serves as an editor at The Kenyon Review. He is Director of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College. At the event, Torday will read from his most recent novel The Last Flight of Poxl West. Questions? Contact: Alan Drew

 


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

CFAP Society Philadelphia Suburban Special Event: 2/10
Wednesday, Feb. 10 5 p.m. VSB’s Finance Department is partnering with CFA Society Philadelphia for a suburban special event – “The Evolving Role of Large Institutional Investors in Reshaping Modem Markets”. Come to hear our panel of experts debate the impact that large institutional investors have on the debt and equity marketplaces. Questions? Contact: Angela Layne

Residence Life Blood Drive: 2/11
There is currently a critical shortage of blood products and you can help out by donating on Thursday, Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., in the West Lounge of Dougherty Hall. Make your appointment today at www.redcrossblood.org Sponsor Code: villanovareslife
Questions? Contact: Jennifer Liberato

Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award: 2/15
The Center for Peace and Justice Education is pleased to announce General Roméo Dallaire as the 2015 Adela Dwyer/St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award recipient. His lecture “Are All Humans Human?” will be held Monday, Feb. 15, 5 p.m., Villanova room. General Dallaire commanded the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Rwanda prior to and during the 1994 genocide. His courage and leadership during this ill-fated mission have earned him recognition, affection, and admiration from around the globe. In recent years he has turned his attention to the use of child soldiers. General Dallaire will receive the 2015 Adela Dwyer-St. Thomas of Villanova Peace Award for his work to raise awareness about and eradicate the use of children as weapons of war. Questions? Contact: Sharon Discher


UNPRINTABLE FICTION

Have you heard of the new e-book experiments in designing unprintable fiction? A fascinating challenge to reading in the new millennium, unprintable fiction is quite literally stories that cannot be printed, for they use choice-making and physical location and other such technology-dependent methods of storytelling and narrative progression. Since new stats suggest that 92% of students prefer print books to e-books, the unprintable fiction initiative is surely a way to maximize the creative potential, and not the redundancy, of digitalized literature.

cat-ipad


QUOTE OF THE DAY

The first black author to win a Pulitzer Prize, Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) was a Chicagoan poet with a prolific bibliography. A child poet turned university poetry professor, Brooks was not only the first black Pulitzer winner, but also the first black woman to serve as poetry consultant for the Library of Congress. You can find a dozen and a half holdings by Brooks (and even more about Brooks!) in our collection today.

gwendolyn brooks smiling

“A writer should get as much education as possible, but just going to school is not enough; if it were, all owners of doctorates would be inspired writers.” – Gwendolyn Brooks

image from poetryfoundation.com


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ICYMI: 2015 | A Year in Photos

A whole year has come and gone in the blink of an eye. It’s already the second month of a new one! You know, there’s something about academic institutions that seems to make years go by even faster than usual. Perhaps it’s seeing young faces leave as educated adults every year, or perhaps it’s the old adage “time flies when you’re having fun” proving true. Well, we’ve certainly have had fun here at Falvey. In case you missed it, here’s just but a wee sampling of good memories and good times with good people in 2015!

The photographs below give you a look at some of the numerous events held in Falvey, ranging from the celebration of the Rev. Dennis Gallagher’s 50th anniversary as an Augustinian priest and Bill Greene’s 40th anniversary as a Falvey employee through a variety of other activities and the annual decoration of the library Christmas tree. As you can see Falvey is a busy place, hosting or cohosting numerous events such as the Reading Villanova series, a visit from the One Book Villanova’s author,  a March Madness Bracketology, the annual Falvey Scholars program and a December Star Wars-themed Stress Busters afternoon with visits from Darth Vader, Han Solo and Will D. Cat. Special Collections created several exhibits including one commemorating the centennial of the sinking of the Lusitania in addition to those pictured. And we welcomed a new Library Director, Millicent Gaskell.


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The 8:30 | Things to Know Before You Go (2/8)

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SAVE THE DATE…

Digital Scholarship Brown Bag Conversation. Thursday, 2/11 at 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in room 205. Digital scholarship (formerly ‘digital humanities’) is one of the most prominent trends in the humanities and social sciences in recent years. What is it exactly, and what does it mean for research and teaching at Villanova? Bring your lunch and your ideas for a conversation with Library staff about the state of the art of digital scholarship on campus. Coffee and tea will be provided. Drop in and out anytime. Questions? Contact: Nik Fogle


Happening @ ‘Nova
Be sure to check out these noteworthy events that are taking place on Villanova’s campus soon!

6th Annual Spotlight on Leadership w/ Dr. Darryl Ford: Today!
The Office of Student Involvement invites you to attend the 6th Annual Spotlight On Leadership themed, “Servant Leadership in the Augustinian Tradition,” with Darryl Ford, PhD. Class groups are welcome to attend this ACS APPROVED event. 4:30 p.m., in the Villanova Room, Connelly Center. Student, faculty and staff tickets are free; however, registration is required at www.villanovatix.com Questions? Contact: DeVon Jackson

CFAP Society Philadelphia Suburban Special Event: 2/10
Wednesday, Feb. 10 5 p.m. VSB’s Finance Department is partnering with CFA Society Philadelphia for a suburban special event – “The Evolving Role of Large Institutional Investors in Reshaping Modem Markets”. Come to hear our panel of experts debate the impact that large institutional investors have on the debt and equity marketplaces. Questions? Contact: Angela Layne

Residence Life Blood Drive: 2/11
There is currently a critical shortage of blood products and you can help out by donating on Thursday, Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., in the West Lounge of Dougherty Hall. Make your appointment today at www.redcrossblood.org Sponsor Code: villanovareslife
Questions? Contact: Jennifer Liberato


VILLANOVA HISTORY FROM THE ARCHIVES…
“Anent the Library:  The reading-room [not the current Falvey Hall/Old Falvey reading room] with its choice collection of standard works is certainly an alluring spot at the present time, still its frequenters show a decided inclination to ignore the contents of its well-filled cases and eagerly devour the columns of current papers and magazines. This is wrong. …” [A wee bit judgmental, aren’t we?] The Villanova Monthly, Vol.V, No. 2 (Feb. 1897), p. 58. Bound volumes are housed is the University Archives.


YOU WANNA BE IVY LEAGUE?

Well, you can come pretty close now that comparative collegiate reading lists are at your disposal. As Sparky Sweets, PhD of “Thug Notes” says, “Save a few hundred g’s and hit up that library, son!” The Open Syllabus Explorer will tell you what those Ivy League kids are reading and I promise you, we have them all here at Falvey.

Ginger-reading-book-300x250


QUOTE OF THE DAY
Black History Month

Amelia Boynton Robinson was an important figure in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s in Selma, Alabama. She was a champion for African American voting rights and was the first black woman to run for Alabama congress. In March of 1965, Boynton participated in the infamous Bloody Sunday protest, a demonstration that led to violent suppression but brought the Civil Rights movement to national attention. If you are a filmgoer, you might already know that Boynton is played by actress Lorraine Toussaint in the 2014 Ava DuVernay film Selma.

amelia boynton robinson

“It’s important that young people know about the struggles we faced to get to the point we are today. Only then will they appreciate the hard-won freedom of blacks in this country.” – Amelia Boynton Robinson

image via Biography.com


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Last Modified: February 8, 2016