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Foto Friday: Room in the Garden

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“A tulip doesn’t strive to impress anyone.

It doesn’t struggle to be different than a rose. It doesn’t have to.

It is different.

And there’s room in the garden for every flower…”

Marianne Williamson, American author and spiritualist. 


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An Author of Few Words

Barbara Quintiliano with Some Favorite Things

Barbara Quintiliano with Some Favorite Things

What kind of story can you tell in six words? Just ask Barbara Quintiliano, nursing/life sciences and instructional services librarian. She’s an expert at this, having posted 2,225 memoirs so far under her pen name, liberata. Smith Magazine selected Quintiliano as their March 2016 memoirist of the month. March marks her third anniversary with Six Word Memoirs, a project of the online Smith Magazine.

Quintiliano says, “I mean, who can’t write six words? It’s easy and so much fun … Gotta keep on sixing!” One of her six-word memoirs, “Don’t make life a preemptive strike,” is published in The Best Advice in Six Words (released November 2015). The book includes 1,000 contributions including those of celebrities such as Whoopi Goldberg, Molly Ringwald and Lemony Snicket, and Falvey’s own celebrity writer.

Some examples of her other six-word memoirs: “OK, putting my self-doubt to bed,” “Seeking hardcover-wisdom in a Kindle world,” “Progress. Said no to someone today,” “Coffee’s the only weapon I need,” and most appropriate for the six-word format, “I’m really good at doing succinct.” She explains her interest in the Six-Word Memoirs as an outgrowth of her life-long interest in writing in journals, having pen pals and, more recently cyber pals (email).

Quintiliano and Rob LeBlanc, first-year experience/humanities librarian, recently published an article, “Recycling C.R.A.P.:  Reframing a Popular Mnemonic for Library Instruction,” in Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice, volume 3, number 2 (Fall 2015). In 2009 Quintiliano won the Facultas Award.

What is Smith Magazine? It is an online magazine founded and edited by Larry Smith. The magazine is best known for its Six-Word Memoir® project, which Smith launched in November 2006 by asking, “Can you tell your life story in six words?” The challenge became popular with more than one million Six-Word Memoirs published to date.

Before creating Smith Magazine, Larry Smith was an articles editor of Men’s Journal. He had also held other editorial positions and has published articles in The New York Times, Popular Science, Men’s Health, and others.

Who really wrote the first six word memoir? Actually Julius Caesar did it in three words: “Veni, vidi, vici” which translates into six English words: “I came, I saw, I conquered.” Was this Smith’s inspiration? Perhaps, but there is also a legend that Ernest Hemingway was challenged to write a six word story. His answer, “For sale:  baby shoes, never worn.” What ever the answer, the challenge is popular!


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Eighty Five Years of Service to Falvey Memorial Library

On April 27 three longtime Falvey employees received awards at the annual Staff Recognition Dinner. The University presents service recognition pins to employees who have completed ten years of service. Pins are then awarded for fifteen years of service. Falvey’s three honored employees have collectively completed eighty five years of employment.

The Rev. Dennis J. Gallagher, OSA, PhD

The Rev. Dennis J. Gallagher, OSA, PhD

The Rev. Dennis J. Gallagher is Falvey’s longest serving staff member, receiving a Villanova University chair for 40 years of service. Father Gallagher, after some years of library service, was appointed the first full-time University Archivist in 1985, a position he still holds. He has no plans to retire; he looks forward to celebrating Villanova’s 175th anniversary in 2017.

Ann Stango

Ann Stango

Ann Stango, Access Services specialist, has spent her 25 years at Falvey working with Interlibrary Loan Lending (ILL). Stango, who prior to coming to Falvey did displays for QVC, has occasionally helped Joanne Quinn, graphic designer and Communication and Service Promotion team leader, with window exhibits. Stango received a watch as her 25th anniversary service award.

Jacqueline (Jackie) Smith

Jacqueline (Jackie) Smith

Honored for 20 years of service, Jaqueline (Jackie) Smith received a small mantle clock. Smith, Budget and Administrative Services specialist, came to Falvey as a part-time secretary in the Reference department. A year later (1995) she became a full-time employee, working for two departments, Reference and Technical Services. In 2006 her position was renamed and she was assigned to the Director’s Office where she continues to serve.

The honorees and their guests, as well as employees who retired during this academic year, were welcomed by Kenneth G. Valosky, executive vice president. The Rev. Robert P. Hagan, OSA, associate athletics director, offered the invocation. Dinner followed: salad, center-cut sirloin and sea scallops, vegetables, wine, a mocha mousse torte, coffee and tea.

After the meal, service gifts were presented and University President the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 CLAS, gave a brief speech. The evening ended with a benediction by the Rev. Kail C. Ellis, OSA, PhD, special assistant to the president.


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Villanova Basketball Alum’s MLK Artifact

Lincoln_Memorial_I_Have_a_Dream_Marker_2413

via National Park Service Digital Image Archives

VILLANOVA, Pa. – The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, ’75 CLAS, University President, announced that George Raveling, director of international basketball for Nike, a Villanova alumnus and a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, will address the Class of 2016 as the University’s commencement speaker. Raveling, a 1960 graduate of Villanova University with a Bachelor of Science in economics, will also receive the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa. The University’s 173rd commencement will be held Friday, May 13, at 4 p.m., in The Pavilion.

In honor of Mr. Raveling’s Commencement appearance, we are reposting an article from earlier in the year with information and resources on this distinguished alumnus and his connection to Dr. Martin Luther King.

Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I have a dream” speech on August 28, 1963 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial as part of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. To this day the speech is a key piece of oration for the Civil Rights movement. Like every great orator, MLK had some prepared speech notes for his address—notes that actually did not include the famous “I have a dream” section (which was spun on the spot from the heart)—but he did not keep them. What happened to those notes, you ask?

They came into the possession of Villanova alum and College Basketball Hall of Famer George Raveling, class of 1960.

ravelingGeorge Raveling, 10th on Villanova’s all-time rebounding list and the second ever black basketball player at Villanova, was inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013 and the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2015. He was not only a talented college basketball player, but also went on to be an inspiring coach. He got his coaching start as a part-time assistant to Villanova coach Jack Kraft and later went on to coach full-time for Washington State, the University of Iowa, and the University of Southern California. Since retiring from coaching, Raveling has worked as Director for International Basketball for Nike.

So how did Raveling become the proud keeper of MLK’s speech notes? Raveling and his good friend Warren Wilson were only young men when they decided to go to Washington D.C. for the march in 1963. They were approached by one of the march’s organizers and asked to provide security—and they agreed. Raveling wound up just a few feet from MLK on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. He was enthralled by MLK and his message of equality and civil rights. After the speech concluded and the crowd on the steps moved to disperse, he simply asked King, “Can I have that?”

And so they became his.

The notes have since been museum-treated and framed and are stored in a vault for safe-keeping. Raveling does not want to ever sell them, but is interested in their public display; he is currently in talks with various educational and museum groups.

You can read the full Sports Illustrated article on George Raveling and the MLK speech notes here. USA Today also covered the story. To learn more about Raveling’s induction to the College Basketball Hall of Fame, check out this article via VU Hoops.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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2016 Falvey Scholar: Thomas Cox

2016 Falvey Scholar Thomas Cox with certificate

2016 Falvey Scholar Thomas Cox with certificate

Villanova senior Thomas Cox certainly knows how to leave his comfort zone. Cox is a 2016 Falvey Scholar representing the College of Engineering, but his fascinating senior project took a bit of stretching into the worlds of business and technology.  “[The data] was completely different than any kind of data I’m used to working with in Engineering,” Cox admits, “so I had to teach myself an analytics platform and actually build an engine in that.” He says it’s “pretty cool,” and anyone at the 2016 Falvey Scholars Awards Presentation and Reception Ceremony on April 22 would be inclined to agree.

Hailing from Boxford, Massachusetts and a graduate of St. Mark’s School, Cox loves that his hometown doesn’t have any traffic lights and that everyone is a diehard Tom Brady fan–but rest assured Cox found his home away from home here at Villanova, especially playing pickup soccer every Friday. In his short time here, he’s worked in the labs at the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Control (CENDAC) and even built a functioning drone.

But Cox’s senior project required a little less robotics and lot more statistics than his drone venture. Titled “Measuring the Adoption and Deployment Rates of Disruptive Technologies” and developed under mentor Stephen Andriole, PhD, Thomas G. Labrecque Professor of Business, Accountancy & Information Systems, the project explores how companies identify, pilot and deploy specific emerging or “disruptive” digital technologies. Cox explains, for example, that Marriott’s business model is affected by the increasing popularity of the Air B&B service–in this instance, Air B&B disrupts an old business model. Cox obtained the data for his project through surveys, and while there was a statistical learning curve for the engineering student, he is pretty proud of himself for figuring it out: “I can now say I actually have this technical competency when I go into the workforce.”

Falvey Scholar Thomas Cox presenting "Measuring the Adoption and Deployment Rates of Disruptive Technologies."

Falvey Scholar Thomas Cox presenting “Measuring the Adoption and Deployment Rates of Disruptive Technologies.”

Cox is more than ready to take that workforce by storm. His experiences doing consulting projects with real clients as head of the Villanova Consulting Group (VCG) have prepared him for his post-graduation career plans of professional strategy consulting. As for his senior project, Cox is happy that it “wasn’t just looking back at something that happened years and years ago,” but “right now”–being on the cutting edge of technological trends is a sure benefit of his hard work.

That said, Cox isn’t too cool for a little “low tech” gadgetry every now and then: “Even though my project’s on tech and tech trends, I still like, you know, reading physical books,” he says, which is part of why he was in Falvey Memorial Library “all the time.”

The Digital Library and Falvey are pleased to announce that all Falvey Scholar Award recipients’ theses will be digitized and made available to the Villanova Community at http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:180038.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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‘Cat in the Stacks: Signing Off

CAT-STAX4

 I’m Michelle Callaghan, a second-year graduate student at Villanova University. This is our new column, “‘Cat in the Stacks.” I’m the ‘cat. Falvey Memorial Library is the stacks. I’ll be posting about living that scholarly life, from research to study habits to embracing your inner-geek, and how the library community might aid you in all of it.


Graduation is a happy-sad time. It’s hard to let go of the life you’ve known for what feels like forever. You grow so much in college that you might feel a lifetime has passed between freshman year and graduation, or even first-year graduate school and graduation (which is sometimes less than two years!).

It’s important to let yourself feel both the happy and the sad. You will miss your second home, your friends, the community. You might even miss the classwork! But you accomplished something huge.

Maybe you’re not graduating this year, and that’s okay. The end of the semester, whether you’re a student or work in a university, is a time of endings and new beginnings. Take note of everything you accomplished in the past fifteen weeks, year, four years. You probably don’t realize just how much you’ve done! You know you’ve been stressed, but maybe you don’t take the time to see how much of that stress resulted in real productivity.

You’re a superstar, you know. You’re a Wildcat.

Congratulations for everything–graduation, completing another school year, finishing that final paper, getting a full night’s sleep. For being you!

Cheers, Villanova. Thanks for reading.

This ‘Cat is signing out.

barefoot girl in hat holds luggage on lap


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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2016 Falvey Scholar: Meghan Barker

Meghan Barker holding Falvey Scholars Certificate

Meghan Barker holding Falvey Scholars Certificate

2016 Falvey Scholar Meghan Barker is a student of the Institute for Global Interdisciplinary Studies. Her senior project, titled “Bumptious Bodies: Analyzing Pregnant Space in Contemporary Artwork,” was conducted under the mentorship of Sheryl Bowen, PhD, associate professor, area coordinator of organizational communication; Maghan Keita, PhD, professor of history and director of the Institute for Global Interdisciplinary Studies; and Timothy McCall, PhD, assistant professor of art history–and, befitting of any thesis written by an interdisciplinary student, Barker’s project incorporates many fields of study. “Honestly, that’s how I’m wired now,” Barker says of her interdisciplinary training. “After having gone through that major, along with my cohort, that’s just how we think. It’s very challenging for me now to write an English paper and not bring in history and sociology and philosophy.”

Barker’s advisor, Dr. Keita, encouraged Barker to combine her passions of public health issues and artwork. After a gap year, Barker is considering either applying to medical school or nursing schools with DNP programs focused on midwifery–if she were to go onto a PhD program, perhaps medical anthropology or medical humanities–but in her free time, Barker is a painter. She enjoys collage, watercolor, oil, and acrylic painting. Her project is a productive blend of these passions, as she looks at the space of pregnancy through an analysis of contemporary artwork: “I’m looking at how pregnancy is shown in artwork and what that says about how society treats women and how women view themselves.”

Meghan Barker, Student Employee of the Month

Such an undertaking of course entailed a lot of research. Barker is from St. Louis, Missouri–home to caring, genuine people and toasted ravioli–but her second home is probably the Holy Grounds 24-hour lounge in Falvey. She says she just might miss the lounge most of all: “I think a real intellectual community has developed there … it’s all the people who procrastinate and we’re all there at 2 a.m. and there’s this sense of solidarity there. And you get to know so many new people. And I think that I will in some sense miss that even though it was also a very painful experience sometimes when I’m staying up late, chugging down coffee.”

But the 24-hour lounge isn’t the only place in the Library Barker has frequented. “I met with Jutta Seibert [team leader for Academic Integration and subject librarian for history] multiple times to look through artwork and databases. In addition, I utilized multiple books from the Falvey Memorial Library and other institutions via the Interlibrary Loan system.” Barker enjoyed the research and the prospect of more investigation: “Perhaps the most exciting part of this process was discovering discrepancies in the literature and coming to the realization that, even if I cannot fill in the gaps during this project, I have a lifetime to conduct further research if I so choose.”

The Digital Library and Falvey are pleased to announce that all Falvey Scholar Award recipients’ theses will be digitized and made available to the Villanova Community at http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:180038.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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2016 Falvey Scholar: Molly Purnell

Falvey Scholar Molly Purnell with certificate

Falvey Scholar Molly Purnell with certificate

Villanova senior Molly Purnell from the College of Nursing is a 2016 Falvey Scholar. Her research project, titled “The Intergenerational Cycle of Obesity: Nursing Implications and Interventions,” was conducted under the mentorship of Meredith MacKenzie, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, CNE. Purnell says the project stemmed from her clinical paper concerning her Mother and Child clinical rotation. Together with her mentor, Purnell found an area “where there wasn’t that much literature” and, with diligent literature review, crafted a research project on intergenerational obesity and the interventions nurses might take to target that pattern. “There was a lot of information as to what the cycle was and how it worked, but not what the nurses could do,” Purnell explains.

Purnell is from Los Altos, California, where she enjoys “outdoorsy” activities in a bit of a different climate than here on the East Coast. That said, Purnell certainly found her stride on campus, and throughout her four years was very involved in a variety of extracurriculars including Special Olympics, Orientation, Kappa Delta, Liturgical Ministry and SNAP (Student Nurses’ Association of Pennsylvania)–”When I’m busier I can get more done,” she happily admits. As she graduates she says she will miss the community and the way it has shaped her–and the way she has been part of the community in return.    

She found support in the library community to achieve her research goals, which she “never would have thought” she would enjoy as much as she did. She now sees its importance to the field of Nursing, a field “grounded in evidence-based practice. In order to expand the field of nursing, we need to know what areas need more support from the literature.” Purnell largely used the Falvey Memorial Library website and the subject guide Nursing and Medicine. “I utilized search engines such as CINAHL and PubMed. I also utilized skills we have learned in library orientations with the College of Nursing lead by Barbara Quintiliano.”

Molly Purnell resenting "The Intergenerational Cycle of Obesity: Nursing Implications and Interventions"

Molly Purnell resenting “The Intergenerational Cycle of Obesity: Nursing Implications and Interventions”

The skills she learned through her research with Dr. MacKenzie and Falvey Memorial Library are ones she plans to use in the future, especially as she works at her new job with the Georgetown Pediatric Transplant Unit. “I can definitely see myself using the skills I have learned to complete small research projects on my unit next year and possibly even taking it further as I further my education.”

The Digital Library and Falvey are pleased to announce that all Falvey Scholar Award recipients’ theses will be digitized and made available to the Villanova Community at http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:180038.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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2016 Falvey Scholar: Chloe DeEntremont

Chloe DeEntremont, award, Falvey Scholars 2016

One would be hard pressed to find someone who has never heard of or seen a Disney film. Finding someone who’s done a qualitative study on gender representations in Disney films is probably still doable, though a little rarer. But 2016 Falvey Scholar and Communication major Chloe DeEntremont took a whole new targeted approach for her senior research: how do animal sidekicks in Disney films influence gender hierarchies through gendered communication styles? Her project, titled “Patriarchally Ever After?: Disney’s Perpetration of Male Dominance through Animal Sidekicks’ Interactions with Princesses and Princes,” was organized under the mentorship of Sheryl Bowen, PhD, associate professor, area coordinator of organizational communication and Heidi Rose, PhD, director of graduate studies in communication, associate professor of performance studies, and area coordinator of performance studies. The specificity of DeEntremont’s research question might presumably result in a small sample size, but she very quickly discovered the gender dynamics of Disney animal sidekicks suffuse films all across the Disney filmography, resulting in a 110-page thesis and plenty more stones to overturn in future research.  

DeEntremont is from Stony Point, New York–about thirty minutes north of New York City–and she graduated from Albertus Magnus High School in Bardonia, New York. She likes how home is so close to the city but still suburban and forested. DeEntremont, as one might guess,  is a lifelong Disney fan. As a child, she thought that because she had red hair that she was Ariel from The Little Mermaid. Several years later at Villanova, she completed a rhetorical analysis of race in The Princess and the Frog for a qualitative class and could not help but wonder “Maybe Disney isn’t as perfect as I thought it was. What else is going on in Disney that I haven’t seen?”

A fruitful question indeed, and although there is an inherent challenge in researching in-depth the inner workings of something so appreciated, DeEntremont did so bravely and very thoroughly:

From September through December, I spent each day conducting background research for my project using Falvey’s communication guides, specifically Communication & Mass Media Complete, to gather information on anthropomorphism, Disney princesses, and gender hierarchies. I spent hours each week combing through the shelves of the third and fourth floor references searching for old manuscripts and media texts from the 1950s to 1990s on rhetorical methods, feminist criticisms, original fairytales, and Disney’s animal sidekicks. After reading over seventy articles and books, and taking over forty pages of notes and quotes, I narrowed my resources down to forty-two sources for my literature and background content. If it was not for Falvey [Memorial] Library’s extensive records of past and current literature, I would not have gained the materials necessary in accomplishing my thesis goals.

DeEntremont admits that as a freshman, “the databases of Falvey were very intimidating.” But soon one her teachers pointed out the library’s online subject guides and the path became clearer. “I found Mass Media Complete,” she said, praising the EBSCO database. “I’ve been using it since sophomore year … whether it’s Disney or different rhetorical styles, every type of research I do is always Mass Media Complete.”        

The Digital Library and Falvey are pleased to announce that all Falvey Scholar Award recipients’ theses will be digitized and made available to the Villanova Community at http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:180038


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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2016 Falvey Scholar: Tara Malanga

Tara Malanga with Falvey Scholars certificate

Tara Malanga with Falvey Scholars certificate

What do you do when your research project takes on a life of its own? Just ask 2016 Falvey Scholar Tara Malanga from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Life–microscopic life–is the focus of Malanga’s project, titled “Does Nitrogen Addition Irreversibly Alter Soil Microbial Community Composition and Function?” and developed under the mentorship of J. Adam Langley, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Biology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. In a research tale as old as time, Malanga started her journey with a hypothesis in mind, but her results had a different story to tell.

First, Malanga’s story: hailing from Chatham, New Jersey, a town just above New York City, Malanga graduated from Chatham High School, where she ran cross country and track. Even in high school she loved biology and it seemed only fitting that she choose it as her undergraduate major. At Villanova, she has been a member of Villanova Voices, the all-women’s choir, for all four years of her college career. It is where she met some of her best friends since day one on campus.

Tara Malanga: "Does Nitrogen Addition Irreversibly Alter Soil Microbial Community Composition and Function?"

Tara Malanga: “Does Nitrogen Addition Irreversibly Alter Soil Microbial Community Composition and Function?”

As for the topic of her research, it was a direction discovered by chance. Malanga enjoyed her microbiology course with Dr. Langley and so reached out to see if he would take her on as a senior thesis student. While she originally came into biology “thinking pre-med,” she wanted to work with Dr. Langley and so took on the domain of microbial ecology. Learning a new field is a challenge but one Malanga conquered with vigor. “I’ve learned a lot about something that I had absolutely no introduction to until this year,” she says, and credits Falvey Memorial Library for the help: “Falvey’s access to a great number of the most influential scientific journals enabled me to conduct with ease the research necessary to orient myself in the field of microbial ecology… Having access to journals such as Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Global Change Biology, PNAS, and Frontiers in Microbiology I was able to conduct a rather extensive analysis of the literature.” Not only does she consider Falvey’s resources “absolutely indispensable,” but she has also made good use of Zotero, a research tool introduced to her and her biology cohort by librarian Robin Bowles in their thesis seminar class.

As for her thesis itself, Malanga learned a great research lesson applicable to life itself: “The results that we found weren’t what we had originally been looking for,” she admits. “I kept looking for the community changes I had expected based on what I had read, and Dr. Langley [said] ‘well, just look at the data you have there. That’s interesting in itself. Don’t try to make it fit what you wanted to see’–and we ended up finding almost cooler things.”

The Digital Library and Falvey are pleased to announce that all Falvey Scholar Award recipients’ theses will be digitized and made available to the Villanova Community at http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:180038.


Article by Michelle Callaghan, graduate assistant on the Communication and Service Promotion team. She is currently pursuing her MA in English at Villanova University.


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Last Modified: May 9, 2016