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Foto Friday: 175th Anniversary (Demisemiseptcentennial)

175 and counting!

175 and counting!


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The Curious ‘Cat: “Be my valentine!”

Curious 'Cat - imageThis week, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What fictional character would you ask to be your valentine?

Lexie McClatchy – “Noah Calhoun from The Notebook.”


Justin D’Agnese – “Hermione Granger.”


Madeline Ruocco – “Spider-Man.”


Ryan Smith – “Princess Leia.”


Cate Ronan – “Prince Charming from Cinderella!”


Kent Wu – “Elsa from Frozen.”


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Five Books for Valentine’s Day

As the university library on one of the most romantic college campuses in the world, the Falvey Memorial Library has found it judicious to bring some Valentine’s Day literature recommendations to our constituents. Whether you’re single and looking, single and happy, or taken, these books are the perfect companions to spend the day with.

1. “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

This recommendation comes from First Year Experience & Humanities Librarian Rob Leblanc. A contemplation of beauty and love in the midst of the destruction and horror of The Second World War, “The Book Thief” offers the perfect chance to embark on the journey of a boy who uses literature to overcome terror. Whether you’re cuddled up with your significant other, enjoying the heat of the fireplace over a couple of novels or if other obligations have prevented you from seeing your other half, this story will engross you in a world where love truly conquers all.

2. “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr

All The Light We Cannot See

English & Theatre Librarian Sarah Wingo recommends this book for romantics of all kinds. Also set in WWII, this Pulitzer Prize winner recounts the journey of a blind French girl and a German boy as they come of age during WWII. Their paths eventually cross during the American landing at Normandy on D-Day. Following their exchange, one’s path to safety is ensured, while the other remains dangerously trapped on the battlefields of Europe. For anyone thinking about the very nature of romance and love, this story provides an interesting peak at the very drives at the heart of our nature.

3. “The Pastoral Symphony, or, La Symphonie Pastorale” by André Gide

La Symphonie Pastorale

Recommended by Nursing/Life Sciences & Instructional Services Librarian Barbara Quintiliano, this novella is available in our collection in both English and its original French. Also incorporating the device of blindness, this one recounts the relationship that develops between a pastor’s son and a blind girl named Gertrude. As the pastor himself attempts to shield Gertrude from sin, his son falls deeply in love with her and proposes marriage. From there, the story takes an interesting turn that forces the reader to consider lessons of the bible, honesty, and responsibility in love.

4. “Love’s Labour’s Lost” by William Shakespeare

Love Labour Lost

Interested in what happens when four secular men take the oath not to give in to female temptations? Theology / Humanities Librarian Darren Poley recommends this Shakespeare piece. Featuring sovereign decrees, secret romances, and a king in disguise, this comedy features the claim that man’s highest study ought to be love.

5. “A Walk to Remember” by Nicholas Sparks

A Walk to Remember

Information Services Specialist Gerald Dierkes recommends kicking back on the recliner and reading this lovely story from romantic tale expert Nicholas Sparks. “It’s not specifically about Valentine’s Day,” Dierkes says, “but it is a good love story.” For those of you interested in how emotions of the heart may conquer ailments of the body, this book is especially for you.

(Photos courtesy of the Falvey Memorial Library Collection and Google Books)


Website photo 2 Article by William Repetto, a graduate assistant on the Communications and Marketing Team at the Falvey Memorial Library. He is currently pursuing an MA in English at Villanova University.

 

 


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Peek at the Week: Feb. 13-17

PEEK graphic2
Quote of the Week:

“I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo,”
– William Shakespeare, Romeo & Juliet (but, you probably guessed this citation).

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And if not, this would have been a helpful hint (photo from pixabay.com)


Happy almost Valentine’s day! Unless you hate Valentine’s Day, in which case I offer you a happy & regular Monday, February 13th.

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Just a nondescript bouquet of roses, making no claim to any specific upcoming holiday (photo from pixabay.com)


This Week at the Library:

Tuesday, February 14th,
-Faith & Culture Pop-Up Lectures, Room 204, 5:00-6:00 p.m.
-Literary Festival 2017: Brit Bennett, Speaker’s Corner, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wednesday, February 15th,
-Speaker: Delia Popa, Room 205, 3:00-5:00 p.m.

Thursday, February 16th,
-OUS: Pre-Law Advising Workshop, Room 204, 12:05-1:15 p.m.

Friday, February 17th,
-Villanova Electronic Enthusiasts Club, First Floor Lounge, 2:30-4:30 p.m.


#MindfulnessMonday

Chocolates/candies/flowers are cheaper on February 15th. Also, chocolate stores in the freezer for up to six months. Perhaps this information will help you have multiple #mindfulnessmondays. Or at least, #improvedmondays.

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Looking at you, corporate drugstores (photo from pixabay.com)


Save the Date:
Tuesday, February 14th,
Singing Valentine Delivery, All Day

Friday, February 17th
Nova Nights: Silent Disco, Café Nova, 9:00 p.m.


#FalveyPeek at the Week provided by Hunter Vay Houtzer, a graduate assistant on the Communications and Marketing Team at the Falvey Memorial Library. She is working toward an MA in Communication at Villanova University, and on leaving enough time to de-ice/de-snow her car in the morning before leaving for campus. Send your thoughts/suggestions to Hunter at #falveypeek. See you next Monday for more!


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A Memorial Service and Exhibition Opening Attracts Many Visitors

His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon celebrating the Memorial for the Revolution's victims

His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon celebrating the Memorial for the Revolution’s victims

On Feb. 8, over 150 people attended the memorial service for the victims of the Russian Revolutions of 1917 in Corr Chapel and then came to Falvey Memorial Library for the opening of the exhibit, “Blood and Soul:  The Russian Revolutions of 1917.” His Beatitude Tikhon, Archbishop of Washington, Metropolitan of All America and Canada, celebrated the memorial service in the presence of the rare Feodorovskaya Icon of the Mother of God which was then brought to Falvey for that evening only.

His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon gave the opening blessing for the exhibit, “Blood and Soul:  The Russian Revolutions of 1917.” Speakers were Michael Foight, coordinator of Falvey’s Special Collections and Digital Library; Michael T. Westrate, PhD, Director of the Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships and committee member of the Russian Area Studies Concentration; Adele Lindenmeyr, PhD, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and co-founder of the Russian Area Studies Concentration Program. Dean Lindenmeyr welcomed guests and gave a brief presentation about Russian history.

Guests visiting the exhibition had the opportunity to view the Feodorovskaya Icon of the Mother of God which had resided with the imperial family and to which it is said they prayed before being taken into custody and the Romanov Gospel which also belonged to the imperial family. These rare treasures were only on exhibit for that evening. The exhibit was curated by the Very Rev. John J. Perich, curator of the Metropolitan Museum of the Orthodox Church in America and St. Tikhon’s Monastery and Seminary Icon Repository, South Canaan, Pa., and the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, director of the University Art Gallery and curator of the University’s art collections.

The Romanov Gospel on exhibit Feb. 8

The Romanov Gospel on exhibit Feb. 8

A bountiful buffet of homemade Russian foods such as a whole salmon, pate, salad, spreads and deserts was set up in the Speaker’s Corner and in the Holy Grounds Café.

A buffet of homemade Russian foods

A buffet of homemade Russian foods

 

Christel Krugovoy and Anastasia Plisko preparing the buffet

Christel Krugovoy and Anastasia Plisko preparing the buffet

 

Kallie Stahl, Communications & Marketing, preparing flower arrangements

Kallie Stahl, Communications & Marketing, preparing flower arrangements

 

One of the cases filled with Imperial Russian objects

One of the cases filled with Imperial Russian objects

 

The Very Rev. John J. Perich and the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, co-curators of the exhibit in front of the Feodorovskaya Icon of the Mother of God

The Very Rev. John J. Perich and the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, co-curators of the exhibit in front of the Feodorovskaya Icon of the Mother of God

 

Audience with His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon and the Very Rev. John J. Perich

Audience with His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon and the Very Rev. John J. Perich

 

His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon and Very Rev. John J. Perich present a Siberian rock crystal to Dr. Westrate

His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon and Very Rev. John J. Perich present a Siberian rock crystal to
Dr. Westrate

 

The exhibit will remain on view through Sept. 1. As part of the centennial commemoration of the Russian revolutions and the Enthronement of St. Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow there will be occasional lectures and programs while “Blood and Soul” is open.

 

Photographs by Alice Bampton, Communication and Marketing Dept.


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The Curious ‘Cat: “Words of wisdom for future Wildkittens!”

Curious 'Cat - imageIn honor of Early Action Candidates’ Weekend, the Curious ‘Cat asks Villanova students, “What advice would you give to an early action candidate?”

Amy Vera – “I would say talk to the students. We all have different experiences, but we all have one thing in common: that we really love Villanova or else we wouldn’t be here.”


Michael Medina – “I would attend outside-of-class things, like seminars or presentations offered. It would give you a feel of what the values of the university are and you’d know whether those line up with your personal values.”


Natalie Garinther – “I would say to talk to the students because that’s the best way to figure out what the students are like. There were a lot of students sitting in on classes this morning, and that’s a good way to figure out what class sizes would be and how teachers interact with us.”


Rebecca Walters – “I sat in on an acapella rehearsal before I came, so maybe sit in on extracurricular activities. That would be my advice: ask people about their extracurriculars.”


Alison Mabery – “Look at a club you wouldn’t normally be interested in!”


Vivek Mohan -“I would say to try to sit in on classes to just get a good feel of how it is. I know class size is a big factor for a lot of people, and Villanova has a good class size.”


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Foto Friday: Villanova’s Demisemiseptcentennial

Banner on Kennedy Hall

Banner on Kennedy Hall

There are banners all around campus to celebrate this landmark demisemiseptcentennial (175th) anniversary.

 

Photo by Alice Bampton, Communications and Marketing.


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“Blood and Soul: The Russian Revolutions of 1917” Exhibit Opens Today

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The exhibit, “Blood and Soul:  The Russian Revolutions of 1917,” opens today with a 5 pm reception in Falvey Memorial Library. Archpriest John J. Perich, curator of the Metropolitan Museum of the Orthodox Church in America, and the Rev. Richard G. Cannuli, OSA, curator of the University Art Gallery, co-curated and mounted the exhibit which remains open through Sept. 1. The exhibit commemorates the one hundredth anniversaries of the Russian Revolutions and the enthronement of St. Patriarch Tikon of Moscow.

Preceding the opening of the exhibit, at 4 pm in Corr Hall Chapel there will be a memorial service for the victims of the Russian Revolutions.

Both events are open to the public.


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Career Exploration, Test Prep, Resumes and Interviewing-Falvey Has Help

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The Villanova Career Center is holding its Spring Career Fairs in the Connelly Center on February 7 and 8. The Communication, Marketing and Media Fair is Feb. 7, 10 am – 1 pm; Finance, Accounting and Consulting Fair is 3 pm – 6 pm. Engineering, Science, Technology and Big Data Fair is Feb. 8, 10 am – 1 pm.

Linda Hauck, business librarian, prepared a group of “Dig Deepers” which can provide Villanovans with useful information about careers, test preparation, resumes and interviewing.

 

Dig Deeper:  Career Exploration

Career Information Subject Guide

Career Outlook

Occupational Outlook Handbook

O*NET

CareerOneStop

 

Dig Deeper:  Test Preparation

McGraw-Hill’s MCAT:  Medical College Admission Test

MCAT Physics Review

Master the LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

LSAT Logic Games for Dummies

Cracking the GRE (a graduate-level admissions test)

Cracking the NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse)

The Official Guide for GMAT Quantitative Review (Graduate Management Admission Test)

 

Dig Deeper:  Resumes and Interviewing

CVs, Resumes, and LinkedIn:  A Guide to Professional English

Purdue Online Writing Lab:  Resumes and Vitas

Answering Tough Interview Questions for Dummies

Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google?

The Essentials of Job Negotiations:  Proven Strategies for Getting What You Want

 

Linda resizedLinda Hauck can be reached at 610-519-8744. Her office is room 222 in Falvey’s second floor Learning Commons.

 

 

 

Hauck’s photo courtesy of Falvey Memorial Library. Mortarboards courtesy of Pixabay.com.


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Villanova Theatre Presents the U. S. Premiere of Stacey Gregg’s Lagan

Lagan poster resize

 

 

The critically-acclaimed play, Lagan by Stacey Gregg, makes its American debut on Feb. 7 in the Villanova Theatre. The play, directed by Kathryn MacMillan, MA, ’01 CLAS, will be presented from Feb. 7 – 19. Lagan tells the stories of four families in Belfast, Ireland; their voices explore the history, legacy and impact of war.

Villanova Theatre will host Speaker’s Night following the Feb. 16 performance. Owen McCafferty, Kathryn MacMillan and Rachel O’Hanlon Rodriguez, the production’s dramaturg, will share their insights.

 

Dig Deeper: 

Gregg’s works

Last year Gregg spoke as part of a panel for The Theatre of War Symposium at the Abbey Theatre (with whom Villanova has a close relationship)

An article from 2015 where she speaks of gender, identity, and the lack of women in the arts

The Abbey Theatre’s page about her   https://www.abbeytheatre.ie/people/view/stacey_gregg

Link to Villanova Theatre’s production page for Lagan

 

Sarah Wingo copyThe Dig Deeper links were provided by Sarah Wingo, English literature and theatre librarian. Her office is room 223. Telephone: 610-519-5183.


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Last Modified: February 6, 2017