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#FotoFriday: Apollo 11 Display to Mark 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing

beaudry

On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the #Apollo11 moon landing, we received a copy of the Sunday New York Times featuring the event! (Here, Beaudry Allen, Preservation and Digital Archivist, meets with donor Mark Shiffman, PhD, Associate Professor, Classical Studies.)


Shawn ProctorShawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


#TBT: Sweet Times at the Oreo

The Oreo statue in 1991, The Awakening, and students

The Awakening, an abstract sculpture donated by artist Jay Dugan, greets students as they make their way through campus. The dome of Alumni Hall peeks through the trees.

 

THROWBACK THURSDAY

Check out this throwback to 1991. Students walk on campus with The Awakening statue, or what is now fondly known as the “Oreo,” in the background. The statue has been a well-loved campus landmark since 1985.

For more information on the Oreo sculpture, check out this sweet blog by Alice Bampton.

Photo Credit: Alan Nyiri, 1991.


Regina Duffy is Communication and Marketing Program Manager at Falvey Memorial Library. She is a big fan of mint Oreos.


The Curious ‘Cat: Recent Reading Recommendations (Part II)

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asked Sarah Wingo, Librarian for English Literature, Theatre, and Romance Languages and Literature, about her recent reads: 

Book-to-screen adaptation: His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman

Authors who visited Villanova: I’d highly recommend checking out one of Michael Hollinger‘s or James Ijames’s plays. They are both exceptional playwrights and faculty in Villanova’s theatre department. Their plays have been produced at Villanova and professionally in Philadelphia and elsewhere.

Genre you never read before: I’ve been trying to read more books related to politics and activism and one that I really enjoyed was Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement by Angela Y. Davis.

Book whose cover you loved: Penguin has been doing these really gorgeous hardcover editions of their classics for about 10 years now and I really like them.

Book you meant to read in the last year: The Binti Trilogy by Nnedi Okorafor

A ghost story: Through the Woods (graphic novel) by Emily Carroll

Climate fiction book: The Southern Reach Trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer

A biography: I’m not a big reader of biography, but I like memoirs. I recently read Michelle Obama’s book Becoming, which is excellent. I’d also highly recommend any of Carrie Fisher’s memoir and nonfiction work.

Book recommended by a friend: The Book of The Unnamed Midwife by Meg Elison

Your summer reading recommendation: Circe or The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

Interested in additional reading recs and/or research help? Contact Wingo: sarah.wingo@villanova.edu


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


To the Moon! Falvey Honors the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Launch

A white board drawing of the Apollo 11 launch.

For the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch, which resulted in three astronauts landing on the moon, Falvey staff drew a white board sketch of the rocket blasting off.


MLA International Bibliography has moved to EBSCO

On 26 June, 2018, the editor of the MLA International Bibliography (MLAIB) announced to subscribers that beginning this summer EBSCO would be the single vendor for this resource and the accompanying MLA Directory of Periodicals (MLADP).

MLA has now switched over from ProQuest to EBSCO and the appropriate links on the library’s website have been changed.

MLA International Bibliography with Full Text: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip,uid&custid=s8877782&groupid=main&profile=ehost&defaultdb=mlf

MLA International Bibliography covers literature, language and linguistics, folklore, film, literary theory and criticism, dramatic arts, as well as the historical aspects of printing and publishing. Listings on rhetoric and composition and the history, theory, and practice of teaching language and literature are also included.

In addition to the bibliography, the database includes the MLA Directory of Periodicals, the association’s proprietary thesaurus used to assign descriptors to each record in the bibliography. It also provides a proprietary, searchable directory of noted authors’ names with links to brief descriptive notes.

As usual, the EBSCOhost MLA International Bibliography and Directory of Periodicals databases are cross-searchable with other EBSCOhost databases via the Choose Databases link at the top of the screen.

Research users will need to download any saved searches and documents from their My Research account (ProQuest). Similar options for saving documents and searches are available via a My EBSCOhost account. Additionally, users wishing to retain any alerts will need to set these up in a My EBSCOhost account.

EBSCOhost has made several video tutorials on using the MLA International Bibliography on EBSCO available here: (https://connect.ebsco.com/s/article/MLA-International-Bibliography-on-EBSCOhost-Tutorials?language=en_US ).


 

 

 

 

Sarah Wingo, MA, MSI, is the Liaison Librarian for English Lit, Theatre,  & Romance Languages at Falvey Memorial Library.


FotoFriday: Transforming the Bard’s Work Into Art

Alice Dailey contemplates the art project that will transform Shakespeare books into art mourning the passing of time.

“As a scholar, I recognize the labor and time that goes into the composition of these #books. Each book is a unit of human time. I’m searching for a way to acknowledge what it means for that time to be over.”–Professor Alice Dailey, discussing her art project, which will transform nearly 500 deselected #shakespeare books into #art reflecting the passing of time


#TBT: Dorm Days

Student in dorm room in 1991

 

THROWBACK THURSDAY

As we inch closer to the start of a new academic year, Villanova is beginning to prepare for the busy days to come. Dorm days are on the horizon again as we approach Orientation and Move-In Day in August.  Enjoy this fun throwback to 1991, when corded phones were all the rage and the dorm room décor looked a tad different.

If you are looking for more flashback photos and information about the history of Villanova, check out the book Ever Ancient, Ever New: Villanova University 1842-1992. It’s available at Falvey’s reference desk for in-house viewing.

Photo credit: Alan Nyiri, 1991.

 


 

Regina Duffy is a communication and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.

 

 


The Curious ‘Cat: Recent Reading Recommendations

This week, the Curious ‘Cat asked First Year Experience Librarian Rob LeBlanc about his recent reads:

Book-to-screen adaptation: Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

Author who visited Villanova: The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

Genre you never read before: (Kitchen science) What Einstein Told His Cook by Robert Wolke

Book whose cover you loved: Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris

Book you meant to read in the last year: (Re-read) Dune by Frank Herbert

A ghost story: End of Watch by Stephen King

Climate fiction book: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

A biography: John Adams by David McCullough

Book recommended by a friend: Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

Your summer reading recommendation: The Book Thief by by Markus Zusak

Interested in additional reading recs and/or research help? Contact LeBlanc: robert.leblanc@villanova.edu


Kallie Stahl, MA ’17 CLAS, is communication and marketing specialist at Falvey Memorial Library.


The Art of the Cell: Meet Ritesh Karsalia, 2019 Falvey Scholar

Ritesh Karsalia, 2019 Falvey Scholar

Ritesh Karsalia receives the Falvey Scholar Award from Jeehyun “Jee” Davis, Associate University Librarian for Collections and Stewardship.

BY SHAWN PROCTOR

This is part 6 of a 6-part series featuring the 2019 Falvey Scholars. Read more about them every Tuesday and in the upcoming issue of Mosaic: the library’s bi-annual publication.

Scholarly Stats:

Ritesh Karsalia ’19 CLAS (Biology major; Latin American Studies, Spanish Language & Literature minors)

Hometown: Colonia, New Jersey

Faculty Mentor: Anil Bamezai, PhD, Professor, Director Graduate Program

Research: “Investigating the role of ordered (Io) and disordered (Id) phases within the plasma membrane of primary CD4+ helper T lymphocytes in their antigen-specific responses”

 

In his own words:

Ritesh’s Research:

My research process is founded on the scientific method, which has allowed me to conduct empirical experiments to test various immunological hypotheses. The subset of my laboratory group that I’ve focused on has been the spatiotemporal regulation of CD4+ helper T cells in response to foreign antigens.

While my principal investigator has been conducting research in this field for much of his professional career, not much information is known about the dynamic orchestration of cellular membrane-proximal signaling events and how they specifically affect the immune cell’s ability to respond. Therefore, I first began compiling the current scientific literature related to lipid-raft signaling and membrane-proximal CD4+ T cell signaling in order to locate the gaps in the current knowledge base.

My research project ultimately builds upon a series of previous studies that investigates how the order of cellular membranes, regulated by lipids, proteins, and cholesterol situated within regions called lipid-rafts, affects the ability of CD4+ T cells to respond appropriately. There are a few studies that have previously discovered that the order of CD4+ T cell membranes can be disrupted with a cholesterol-derivative, 7-ketocholesterol, leading to a decreased CD4+ response in the presence of a foreign antigen.


“CD4+ T cells are the major regulators of our immune system, and with so much disease history and technological developments in our modern world, I did not think that there were still so many question marks related to CD4+ T cell responses.” –Ritesh Karsalia, 2019 Falvey Scholar


Analyzing these studies allowed me to understand that increased membrane disorder leads to decreased CD4+ T cell response, if the disorder is induced relatively early (within 24 hours of antigen presentation). I then asked the broader questions of 1) whether this process is reversible and 2) how this process mechanistically occurs. Previous investigations had been unable to determine these aspects of this phenomenon, and the answers to these questions would allow scientists to better modulate CD4+ T cell responses though membrane order/disorder.

After asking these questions, I again went through the published scientific literature and looked at previous studies conducted by previous members in my laboratory to look for different biological mechanisms that could be affecting this process. I learned what mechanisms had already been unsuccessfully shown to affect this process and looked at some of the other promising events governing T-cell activation as areas of inquiry.

By reading previous literature that explained how 7-ketocholesterol specifically disrupts the order of lipid-rafts, I was able to hypothesize a potential way to Ritesh Karsalia next to fountainreconstitute the disordered membrane and assess CD4+ T cell response, afterwards.

I started physically performing cell-culture experiments to test my hypotheses. I worked with DO11 BALB/c transgenic mice that were bred in the vivarium in the Mendel Science Center. Since I was primarily focused on analyzing the cellular responses of CD4+ T cells, I harvested the lymph nodes from these cells and appropriately treated these cells to test my hypotheses.

These treatment groups included solutions containing 7-ketocholesterol (to induce disorder) and cholesterol (to reconstitute order). Multiple concentration ranges were used for each treatment group to understand relevant dosage-effects. To gain a better understanding of the biological mechanism(s) affecting membrane-order-based responses, western blots were used to analyze ubiquitination patterns after the T-cells were appropriately treated with 7-ketocholesterol and/or cholesterol and stimulated with a monoclonal antibody.

The expression of CD69, an early activation marker of cell activation that is implicated with CD4+ T cell proliferation, was also analyzed using flow cytometry to understand if the processes governing the expression of this protein were affected by increased membrane disorder. For all the experiments I performed, MTT assays, which measure the metabolic activity of cells, were used to quantify how much proliferation and activation occurred in each treatment group.

 

Ritesh’s “Falvey Experience”:

The Falvey Memorial Library staff and the resources were crucial to the success of my research project. I am extremely grateful for the subscriptions that the Falvey Library provided to a diverse array of online scientific journals.

As my research project was founded upon related previous studies, and a lot of my work focused on filling in the gaps between these works, I was only able to access the hundreds of publications that I have read along the course of my project due to the library’s subscriptions.

These resources were also valuable when I was performing my experimental procedures. For example, I needed to isolate macrophages (which present the foreign antigens to the CD4+ cells) as part of my procedure when setting up my cell cultures to test for the effect of the different treatment groups. My laboratory did not have the kit that would allow me to isolate these macrophages from the lymph nodes of our mice, and the cost of the kit (over $1000) exceeded my budget. Thanks to the subscriptions that Falvey Library provided, I was able to find an alternate procedure which involved harvesting the macrophages from the bone marrow of the mice. This procedure was one which was unfamiliar to my laboratory group, but using the resources that the library provided, I was able to successfully implement the procedure into my experiment.

Additionally, I attended numerous presentations by Robin Bowles, then Falvey’s Nursing and Biology Librarian, when I was participating in the Villanova Undergraduate Research Fellowship for my research project. Robin helped me tremendously when it came to performing targeted searches for publications relevant to my project.Ritesh at the lectern

Unfortunately, there isn’t a lot of information known about the spatiotemporal regulation of the cell membrane in the context of CD4+ T cell responses. Early in the summer, I visited Robin in the library – thanks to her help, I was able to gain access to a relatively recent international publication about CD69’s implication in tumor immunity. Through the interlibrary loan system and the help of Robin, I was able to access this publication. This was a very helpful document in persuading me to investigate CD69 expression as a part of my research project. Robin’s presentations also introduced me to Zotero and proper reference management. I have not had much exposure to writing scientific literature before this project, so the resources that the library provided to introduce me to documentation management, in-text citations, and creating an appropriate works cited section were invaluable.

 

 

The Impact on Him:

This project taught me the importance of using past research and inquiry as a guide to understanding the current state of our knowledge base and as a building block to expand upon. After completing my research project, I’ve really come to understand how the work that we, as critical thinkers and investigators, perform is really part of a larger academic collective.

When asking new questions and expanding upon the questions that our colleagues have previously asked, we’re ultimately creating a more comprehensive knowledge base for the future. It was extremely humbling to realize how the work that I performed is directly connected to the work that other international investigators have performed for tens of years.

This experience has influenced my academic goals because it has also taught me how much more information is still out there to be uncovered, and how crucial investigation is towards the advancement of science.

As an aspiring healthcare professional, I was shocked to learn that so many of the processes related to CD4+ T cell signaling are still unknown. CD4+ T cells are the major regulators of our immune system, and with so much disease history and technological developments in our modern world, I did not think that there were still so many question marks related to CD4+ T cell responses.

What’s Next:

This experience has made me more cognizant of the importance of scholarly inquiry and has persuaded me to continue performing research as I advance in medical school and become a physician. The work I will one day be able to perform as a physician will only be possible due to past research, so I hope to continue to contribute to the field and aid in its advancements through further scholarly investigations.

 


 

 

 


Shawn Proctor, MFA, 
is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


“Did You Ever Read…?” — Falvey Library Invites New Resource Recommendations From Faculty and Students

Did you know that Falvey Memorial Library has more than one million books, periodicals, and other resources?
book recommendations screen shot

Still, the collection at the Library is always a work-in-progress, adapting to meet the needs of the University’s faculty and students. If you review the Library’s holdings and find there is a useful book or resource missing from the collection, please be sure to submit a request so we can continue to evaluate and tweak our collection.

While checking out the website, we also recommend you browse our “trending” and “newly added.” There are a ton of great books just waiting for a great reader (like you)!


Shawn Proctor

Shawn Proctor, MFA, is communications and marketing program manager at Falvey Memorial Library.


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Last Modified: July 8, 2019