FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Falvey Memorial Library Blog

Elie Wiesel, 1928 – 2016

829px-Elie_Wiesel

Elie (Eliezer) Wiesel, Holocaust survivor, charismatic lecturer, professor, Nobel Prize for Peace winner and prolific author, died July 2 after a long illness. Wiesel, born in Romania to a family which spoke Yiddish, German, Hungarian and Romanian, was sent with his parents and sisters to a confinement ghetto in 1944 at age 15. From there the family was sent to Auschwitz where his mother and younger sister died. Wiesel and his father were sent to Buchenwald where his father died a few weeks before the United States Army liberated the concentration camp on April 11, 1945.

After World War II Wiesel studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and worked as a journalist for Israeli and French newspapers. He wrote his first book, a 900 page memoir about the Holocaust, in Yiddish. A shorter version was published in French in 1955 and in 1960 the English translation was published as Night. Night was eventually translated into 30 languages.

Wiesel came to the United States in 1956 where he continued to write, to be an activist and  became a college professor. He won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

Dig Deeper:  Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel Foundation

Nobel Prize award speech

Wiesel as an author

CNN obituary

New York Times obituary

Washington Post obituary

Falvey’s holdings:  Books by and about Wiesel

 


Photo: Elie Wiesel, Professor of the Humanities, Boston University, USA speaks during the session ‘269 A New Agenda: Combining Efficiency and Human Dignity’ at the ‘Annual Meeting 2003’ of the World Economic Forum in Davos/Switzerland, January 28, 2003. Copyright by World Economic Forum swiss-image.ch/photo by Sebastian Deranges. Retrieved 7-6-16 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elie_Wiesel.jpg. 

 


Like

Brexit and the European Union

Brexit resized

 

The relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union has never been an easy one.  It took over 11 years from the first decision to apply for membership in 1961 to the 1973 legislation mandating membership.  By comparison, the referendum known as BREXIT, to leave the European Union, was swift, but the fall-out is likely to reverberate long into the future from the United Kingdom to Europe and beyond.

The Financial Times has posted a brief video explaining how the UK fit into the EU and VOX has posted a deck on what the BREXIT vote means. For other expert and concise explanations of how the European Union developed see the CQ Political Handbook of the World Online  or The European Union: A Very Short Introduction.

For more in-depth analyses of Britain and the EU with regard to integration, monetary policy, competition, nationalism, social policy, migration, & political developments our print and ebook collection has much to offer.  Search Books & More for “European Union” AND Britain or “European Union” AND “United Kingdom” to find books like these.

Stranger in Europe resize

A Stranger in Europe:  Britain and the EU From Thatcher to Blair

 

 

 

 

Cover 2 resizeBritish National Identity and Opposition to Membership of Europe, 1961-63:  The Anti-Marketeers

 

 

 

The Official History of Britain and the European Community from Rejection to Referendum, 1963-1975

For the best up to the minute coverage on the repercussions of the BREXIT vote, authoritative news & analysis can be found on news outlets.  The Financial Times (sign up for a Villanova subscription), The Guardian, The Economist and Foreign Affairs are top picks.  If you hit the paywall limit for the publications, switch to free access via the library Journal Finder.  Other economic, global commentary and information can be found at the London School of Economics, Project Syndicate and Bruegel.  Of course the Official Website of the EU will have unfiltered news about developments.


Linda Hauck, Business librarian, provided this information with input from Merrill Stein, Geography and Political Science liaison team leader.

Linda Hauck resize 2Linda Hauck, Business Librarian. 610-519-8744. Falvey, room 222.

 

 

 

 

Merrill Stein resize 2Merrill Stein, Geography and Political Science team leader, Assessment team leader. 610-519-4272. Falvey, room 221.

 

 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence resized

The Declaration of Independence: A Transcription

IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.–Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.
He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.
He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.
He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.
He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.
He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.
He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers.
He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.
He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.
He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.
He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power.
He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:
For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:
For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:
For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:
For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:
For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury:
For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences
For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies:
For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:
For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.
He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.
He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.
He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.
He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our Brittish brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

The 56 signatures on the Declaration appear in the positions indicated:

Column 1
Georgia:    Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton

Column 2
North Carolina:   William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn
South Carolina:  Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton

Column 3
Massachusetts:  John Hancock
Maryland:  Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton
Virginia:  George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton

Column 4
Pennsylvania:  Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross
Delaware:  Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean

Column 5
New York:  William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris
New Jersey:  Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark

Column 6
New Hampshire:  Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple

Massachusetts:  Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry
Rhode Island:  Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery
Connecticut:  Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott
New Hampshire:  Matthew Thornton

 

 

 

 


Like

Celebrating the Glorious Fourth

free-fireworks-image-11

The United States celebrates its independence from Great Britain on the 4th of July, the day in 1776 on which the delegates to the Continental Congress ratified the Declaration of Independence.JUTTA-BB

We know from an article which appeared in The Pennsylvania Evening Post on July 5, 1777, that the first Independence Day anniversary was celebrated with the discharge of thirteen cannons in the port of Philadelphia in honor of the original thirteen states. The ships were decorated in red, white and blue streamers. Congress gathered for an elegant dinner to which the president and numerous other guests of honor were invited.

A captured band of Hessian musicians played suitable tunes interrupted by repeated toasts. Bonfires and fireworks lit up the evening sky, and the peals of bells closed out the day.

Not much has changed since then. Food, fireworks, parades and the national colors are still at the center of today’s celebrations, and the Glorious Fourth continues to capture the national imagination. The Library has a wealth of information in both print and electronic form for those who would like to learn more about the history of the Declaration of Independence.

On our shelves:

Andrew Burnstein’s America’s Jubilee takes a critical look at the fifty year anniversary of independence in 1826, which also happens to be the day on which two of the Declaration’s signers, frenemies John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, died. William Hogeland takes a close look at the nine weeks leading up to July 4, 1776, in his Declaration, and Alan Dershowitz follows the sources which influenced Jefferson’s text in America Declares Independence.

David Armitage’s The Declaration of Independence: A Global History delineates the impact of the U.S. Declaration as it resonated around the world. Armitage looks at over one hundred declarations of independence to demonstrate the global influence of the U.S. Declaration, and Alexander Tsesis’ For Liberty and Equality synthesizes the continuing impact of the Declaration on American life.

Online:

Noteworthy among Falvey’s digital primary-source collections are the American Founding Era collection which contains the papers of George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James and Dolley Madison, and Alexander Hamilton; the American State Papers with the executive and legislative documents of the first fourteen U.S. Congresses; and America’s Historical Newspapers, which includes early American newspapers back to 1690.

Happy Independence Day from the staff at Falvey Memorial Library!

 

Jutta 60x80Jutta Seibert is the team leader for Academic Integration as well as the coordinator of the liaison team to the departments of history, sociology and criminal justice.


Like

“Now comes the news of battle”: July 1, 1916 – the Somme

While primarily considered a British offensive, the Battle of the Somme, which started on July 1, 1916, one hundred years ago this week, involved troops of many nationalities. This bloodiest battle of the Great War which would kill over a million soldiers and which serves to this day as the icon for the war’s futility, was also the source of patriotic pride and sacrifice for for Irish soldiers under arms for king and county.

The Ulster Division’s sacrifice on July 1, 1916 is clearly depicted in the rare unit history: With the Ulster division in France : a story of the 11th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (South Antrim Volunteers). Available in digital reproduction from Villanova University’s Digital Library this work was published in Belfast from the manuscript of Arthur Purefoy Irwin Samuels killed in action in 1916, and created for veterans by veterans. With photographs, maps, and a roster of the Battalion, this unit history of the 11th Battalion R.I.R. (S.A.V.) reaches greatest poignancy when one notes the penciled in status on the unit roster showing “Killed” next to the names of the dead by the book’s former owner – one of the survivors. These faces still gaze out of the page with hope and resignation.

The poem, The Red Hand of Ulster: Somme – July 1st, 1916 starts on page 57. This literary work gives immediate voice to the emotions of sacrifice shared by the closest of companions. From stanza 4:

Now comes the news of battle-

The long awaited roll

Of our great Western rampant-

A wall of thews, and soul-

And Ulster’s sons are writing

Their names upon a scroll.


Like

Hamilton – The Man and the Musical

Portrait of Alexander Hamilton

Portrait of Alexander Hamilton

 

Hamilton: An American Musical

“Hamilton: An American Musical”

The very popular, Tony Award winning “Hamilton:  An American Musical” has drawn increased interest in the historical Alexander Hamilton (1755/57 – 1804). Lin-Manuel Miranda, the author of the book, music and lyrics for the musical, wrote a high school paper about the 1804 duel between Alexander Hamilton and Vice President Aaron Burr. This initiated his interest in Hamilton which he followed up by reading Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography of Alexander Hamilton. “Hamilton:  An American Musical” opened on Broadway January 20, 2015. In 2016 the show won a Grammy Award  for the Best Musical Album and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Jutta 60x80Jutta Seibert, Academic Integration team leader, provided this list of references (and comments) to satisfy your curiosity.

 

Dig Deeper- Alexander Hamilton:

Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004. The biography that inspired Lin-Manuel Miranda, the creator of the musical. For those who find Chernow’s biography too long, I recommend Forrest McDonald’s biography in American National Biography Online.

Hamilton: The Revolution: Being the Complete Libretto of the Broadway Musical, With a True Account of Its Creation, and Concise Remarks on Hip-hop, the Power of Stories, and the New America, 1st edition.  New York: New York: Grand Central Publishing, Melcher Media, 2016. (Currently on course reserve.) The libretto of the musical.

Books about Alexander Hamilton

The writings of Alexander Hamilton

The Papers of Alexander Hamilton

The Papers of Alexander Hamilton Online version based on the twenty-seven volumes of the letterpress edition edited by Harold Syrett et al. and published by Columbia University Press between 1961 and 1987.

The Federalist Papers Open access digitized version of the Federalist Papers. Hamilton wrote 56 of the 85 essays known today as the Federalist Papers. The remaining essays were authored by John Jay and James Madison.

Books about the Federalist Papers.

 


Like
1 People Like This Post

Call for abstracts: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences

Call for abstracts: The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences

We invite submissions for papers to be presented at a two-day conference on The science of evolution and the evolution of the sciences, which will be held in Leuven, Belgium on the 12th and 13th October 2016.

Submissions should take the form of a 500-word abstract. Submissions on any aspect of the evolution of scientific theories are welcome, but contributions with a clear link to digital humanities are especially encouraged.

Aims and scope of the conference:

One of the longstanding debates in history and philosophy of science concerns how the sciences develop. Thomas Kuhn famously emphasized the role of scientific revolutions and so-called paradigm shifts. Other philosophers, including Karl Popper and David Hull, have offered a Darwinian account of the process of science. In their view, scientists create conjectures about the way the world works, and these conjectures undergo a process of selection as they are tested against the world. This is analogized with biological evolution: mutation and recombination creates novelty in the biological world, which then undergoes natural selection, driving adaptive evolution. In this conference, we will reexamine these ideas using new tools from cultural evolutionary theory and the digital humanities.

This conference explores recent attempts to move beyond mere qualitative theorizing about scientific cultures and their evolution and centers on the the question of the extent to which we can make quantitative predictions, extract quantitative data, or build quantitative models of and about scientific evolution over time. In addition to numerical models of cultural evolution drawn from the evolutionary sciences, quantitative data are also being extracted in the digital humanities. Cultural products like academic journal articles can be algorithmically mined in order to understand this body of work in a new light, offering data to help test hypothesis about scientific changes. By bringing together researchers with a common interest but with different disciplinary backgrounds and toolboxes, we hope to inspire cross-fertilization and new collaborations.

Questions addressed at this conference include:

*  What novel predictions do Darwinian accounts of science offer?

*  How can we test these predictions?

*  Can new work in the digital humanities, such as the automated mining and analysis of the scientific literature, shed light on Darwinian accounts of science?

*  Do formal evolutionary models or (quantitative) textual analyses permit a systematic approach to empirical issues in the realism-instrumentalism debate?

Keynote speakers:

Charles Pence (Louisiana State University)

Kimmo Eriksson (Mälardalen University and Stockholm University)

Mia Ridge (British Library)

Simon DeDeo (Indiana University & the Santa Fe Institute)

Abstracts must be received no later than June 7. Inquiries and abstracts should be directed to the conference organizers, Andreas De Block and Grant Ramsey, at the following addresses:

Andreas.deblock@hiw.kuleuven.be and grant@theramseylab.org

The conference receives financial support from the Institute of Philosophy (KU Leuven) and the FWO (Flemish Research Council).

_______________________

Grant Ramsey

www.theramseylab.org

grant@theramseylab.org

+1 574.344.0284


Like

Dig Deeper: Easter Rising 1916

A Dublin Street After the Rising

A Dublin Street After the Rising

This bibliography provides selected references that provide information about the 1916 Easter Rising (April 24, Dublin, Ireland), which is the subject of the current exhibit presented by Falvey’s Special Collections. The Easter Rising digital exhibit is now live and can be found here. The books listed below are just part of Falvey’s holdings on the subject. Selected online materials also are included.

1916 Ireland’s Revolutionary Tradition. (2016). Kieran Allen.

Easter Rising 1916:  The Trials. (2014). Seàn Enright.

The Rising:  Ireland, Easter 1916. (2010). Fearghal McGarry.

Easter 1916:  The Irish Rebellion. (2006). Charles Townshend.

 Witnesses Inside the Easter Rising. (2005). Annie Ryan.

The Easter Rising. (1999). Michael Foy.

The Easter Rebellion of 1916. (1992). David Trimble.

The Easter Rising. (1987). Nathaniel Harris.

http://www.irishrepublicanbrotherhood.ie/history-irb.html

http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/easterrising.htm

“Gerry Adams and Sinn Fein,” http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ira/conflict/gasf.html

https://www.sinnfein.ie/files/2015/SinnFein2016BrochureWeb.pdf

Information about Joseph McGarrity and the McGarrity Collection:

Special Collections

New Exhibit – Joseph McGarrity: Man of Action; Man of Letters

Online exhibit


Like

Dig Deeper: How Tuesday became Super

usa map vector

What is Super Tuesday?

What began as basically a regional primary in the South came to fruition in 1988 after years of discussion. The same-day primary early in the nominating season quickly gained the unofficial name Super Tuesday. Southern advocates of the idea hoped to draw some attention away from the first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary by scheduling simultaneous primaries a few weeks after New Hampshire’s.

The main goal of the sponsors was to bring forth moderate presidential candidates of national stature who were from the South or were at least acceptable to southern voters (CQ Voting and Elections Collection – Benenson, B., & Tarr, D. (2012). Super Tuesday. Elections a to z (4th ed.). Washington, DC: CQ Press. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/elections/elaz4d_615.3).

The first congressional caucuses appeared in 1800 to select the presidential nominees (CQ Voting and Elections Collection Ezra, M. (2005). The history and development of the nominating process. In P. S. Herrnson (Ed.), Guide to political campaigns in America. Washington, DC: CQ Press. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/elections/g2camp-431-18706-1005825).usa flag button

Primaries and Caucuses

Prior to a general election, there is a selection process to determine which candidate will appear on the ballot for a given political party in the nationwide general election. Political parties generally hold national conventions at which a group of delegates collectively decide upon which candidate they will run for the presidency. The process of choosing delegates to the national convention is undertaken at the state level, which means that there are significant differences from state to state and sometimes year to year. The two methods for choosing delegates to the national convention are the caucus and the primary. Caucuses were the original method for selecting candidates but have decreased in number since the primary was introduced in the early 1900’s  (https://votesmart.org/education/presidential-primary#.Vst88OZVBhR).

The use of primary elections to select party nominees began more than a century ago, as a facet of Progressive Era political reform. (CQ Voting and ElectionsBenenson, B., & Tarr, D. (2012). Primary types. Elections a to z (4th ed.). Washington, DC: CQ Press. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/elections/elaz4d_485.1).

 


Dig Deeper

understanding us presidentialLexisNexis – U.S. Presidential Campaign Tracker

National Journal Race Tracker 2016

USA.gov – Presidential Election Process

CQ Voting & Elections Collection – featured presidential event posts

CQ 2016 Presidential Primary, Caucus Calendar and Delegate Count

CQ – The History and Development of the Nominating Process

CQ Voting and Elections Collection – Primary Types

Everything you need to know about how the presidential primary works – Washington Post

Vote Smart – Government 101: United States Presidential Primary

 

primary politicsBooks:

Primary Politics: Everything You Need to Know about How America Nominates its Presidential Candidates

Understanding the Fundamentals of the U.S. Presidential Election System

Primary elections sources from the Falvey catalog.

 

Select Databases & Articles:

America: History and Life (EBSCO)

CQ Press Library (SAGE)

Social Sciences Citation Index (Thomson Reuters)

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (ProQuest)
Dunne, M. (2012). The long winding road to the white house: Caucuses, primaries and national party conventions in the history of American presidential elections. Historian, (115), 6-12. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1115393470?accountid=14853

Norrander, B., & Wendland, J. (2012). The Primary End Game and General Election Outcomes: Are they Connected?. Forum (2194-6183), 10(4), 119-126. doi:10.1515/forum-2013-0008


SteinArticle written and resources selected by Merrill Stein. Stein is team leader of the Assessment team and liaison to the Department of Political Science. USA flag map by Lokal_Profil via Wikimedia Commons.


Like
1 People Like This Post

Oxford History Handbooks Online

oho

Falvey Library recently acquired the Oxford Handbooks Online history subject collection. The print editions of the Oxford Handbooks have long been popular for their thorough research reviews. It came as no surprise that history faculty expressed strong interest in a switch to the online platform.

The history subject collection currently consists of twenty-eight complete handbooks, but also includes numerous chapters from forthcoming print handbooks. Oxford University Press publishes chapters of handbooks which are still in production on its online platform often long before the print edition becomes available. Thus, Dr. Hartnett’s students are able to read a selection of chapters from the Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History this fall even though the handbook has not yet been published in print. Unfortunately, students and faculty cannot readily discover this exclusive online content as forthcoming handbooks are neither cataloged in the library’s catalog nor indexed in the library’s article database.

OHO exampleThe Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution and two volumes of the Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History will be completed this year. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Russian History, the Oxford Handbook of Europe 1914-45 and the Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Middle-Eastern and North African History are currently in production with available online content. Planned for the future are handbooks about Asian American history, the New Deal, World War II, American political history, the history of race and the history of education.

The library’s catalog provides links to all complete handbooks. Links to individual chapters can readily be created with the help of the digital object identifier (DOI) included in the chapter citations. Copy and paste the number into the library’s link builder application and share the URL via email, syllabus or online classroom. Links are currently the best method to share chapters with students because of known problems with the publisher’s pdf server. Oxford University Press is aware of this problem and will upgrade its server in October. Contact the library if you need pdfs for individual chapters. We will gladly assist you.

doi

Questions or comments? Share them with us online or via email.


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: September 9, 2015