FALVEY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

You are exploring: VU > Library > Blogs > Falvey Memorial Library Blog

Available for proofreading: The Senator’s Favorite

The Senator's FavoriteAs mentioned in our recent post about The Senator’s Bride, that novel was Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller’s only work to spawn a direct sequel. We are now ready to bring the sequel, The Senator’s Favorite, to wider availability in eBook form. By volunteering at the Distributed Proofreaders project, you can help expedite this process and perhaps have some fun in the process. Please read our earlier Proofreading the Digital Library post to learn how it works, then join in the work at the project page.


Like

eBook available: Leonie, the Typewriter

leonie-212x300Our latest Project Gutenberg / Distributed Proofreaders eBook release is Leonie, the Typewriter, a self-described “thrilling romance of actual life” about the startling adventures of a young woman who operates a typewriter. First serialized in the New York Family Story Paper in 1890, and later reprinted as a stand-alone pamphlet, this is a good example of the period’s story paper melodrama, mashing together romance, crime drama and tragedy in an effort to appeal to a broad range of readers.

It is often commented that disguise was a significant trope of this period, and that these stories may have helped to break down traditional cultural barriers. Leonie nicely exemplifies this trend, with its female protagonist disguised as a boy for a good portion of the story, and students of gender studies will likely find the portrayal and some of the plot consequences quite interesting. The story is also remarkably fast-paced, wasting no time in getting to the melodramatic twists and turns, and featuring a few memorably horrific moments before reaching its inevitable happy conclusion.

The entire text of the novel may be read online or downloaded through Project Gutenberg.


Like

eBook available: The Senator’s Bride

The Senator's BrideOur latest Project Gutenberg release, produced with the help of Distributed Proofreaders, is an early novel by Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller, The Senator’s Bride.

Written before she achieved widespread popularity with The Bride of the Tomb, but published later, this shows what sort of novels she might have written if financial needs had not led her to pursue a career writing sensational melodramas. It is also one of her most personal works — a story about losing a spouse and child, written not too long after illness had claimed the lives of her first husband and baby.

That historical context should not lead the reader to believe that this novel is completely without sensation or melodrama, or that it gives a particular deep insight into its author’s psyche; Mrs. Miller was clearly stronger at creating convoluted and surprising plots than she was at conveying emotional depth. However, there are obvious echoes of her life to be observed if you are familiar with her biography, like an interesting tribute to another popular story paper novelist, Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth, who Mrs. Miller visited early in her career, and whose home is pointed out as a significant landmark by a character in the novel. The book also shows — through an overtly racist subplot involving an unfailingly loyal ex-slave, and through its portrayals of former Confederate soldiers — some of the ways in which Mrs. Miller, and presumably many other Southerners of the time, tried to conceptualize the aftermath of the Civil War.

The Senator’s Bride is also noteworthy as Mrs. Miller’s only novel to have a direct sequel — The Senator’s Favorite — written many years later, and likely to be presented here in a few months. Stay tuned! In the meantime, the first novel can be read in its entirety or downloaded through Project Gutenberg.


Like
1 People Like This Post

#ColorOurCollections 2017 Gallery

Here is a round-up of colored images from last week’s #ColorOurCollections extravaganza!

The Bosun and the Comet, colored by Laura B.

The Bosun and the Comet, colored by Laura B.

The Camelopard, colored by Laura B.

The Camelopard, colored by Laura B.

Cover of Comfort, August 1907, colored by Liz A.

Cover of Comfort, August 1907, colored by Liz A.

Cover of Comfort, February 1904, colored by Sue O.

Cover of Comfort, February 1904, colored by Sue O.

Dragons, colored by Sue O.

Dragons, colored by Sue O.

Even though #ColorOurCollections 2017 is over, you can keep coloring all year! Find all of our coloring pages here in the Digital Library.


Like
1 People Like This Post

News of the Day: National Defender Tuesday, April 10, 1860

Posted for: Susan Ottignon, Special Collections.

When I catalog each digital issue of any newspaper, and in this case, the April 10, 1860 digital issue of the National Defender, for the Digital Library, I browse the issue for noteworthy subjects to highlight, or in other words, I assigned subject headings to assist a future researcher in locating the subject. The newspaper’s column, “Personal and Political,” found on page 2, in this issue, caught my eye; I recognized the names Charles Francis Adams and General Jefferson Davis. The remainder of the column’s news impressed me with the wide range of news to report; the reports presented both serious and humorous news to the reader.

The selection conveys what was considered current national news, by the publisher, as well as, I believe, the annotations provide anecdotal information about the news.

The below annotated and transcribed text is from the digitized copy in the Montgomery Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.

National Defender, v. IV, no. 36, Tuesday, April 10, 1860, Whole Number: 192, p. [2].

PERSONAL AND POLITICAL

— The Hon. Charles Francis Adams [1] and the Hon. Josiah Quincy, [2] son, are the largest tax payers in Quincy, Mass. [3] The former pays $1,440, and the latter $485. As trustee, Mr. Adams pays $150 additional to the above named sum.

— Gen. Jefferson Davis [4] is again suffering from inflamation [sic] of the eyes. The surgical operation performed on one, last Saturday a week. It is apprehended, will result in the loss of both.

— The Hon. George N. Briggs [5] of Massachusetts, has been cordially and unanimously elected Chancellor of Madison University. [6] If he accepts the appointment, Dr. Eaton [7] will retire from the Presidency, that he may devote his whole time to the more congenial duties of his Theological Professorship.

— Mr. J. H. Brown, [8] who supports fifty-two young Baptist theological students at Howard College, [9] in Alabama, at an annual cost of $13.000, has recently endowed a theological chair in that college by a contribution of $25,000.

— The widow of the late Rev. Robert Hall, [10] died at her residence near Bristol, England, on the 15th ult., [11] at the advanced age of 74.

— Something out to be done to prevent people from giving vent to their grief in verse when they are bereaved. What fate too hard for the man who appended the following lines to the announcement of a young lady’s death in a neighboring city?
“A few weeks ago she was to be a bride,
But now the grave her lovely form doth hide.”

— On Tuesday night, in Albany, Mr. John Niblock was bitten on the cheek by a man named Meegan, who threw him down and for several minutes gnawed his face. It is feared that mortification or erysipelas will set in.

— The town of Dutch Acera is fixed upon the birth place of a monster. The being is said to have been all covered with hair, to have had six fingers on each hand, and six toes on each foot. It had three heads and a tail, eyes at the back of each head, and three pairs of horns. The account adds that the child was, according to custom, buried alive, and that the mother died eight days afterward.

— Miss Effie Carstang, [12] of St. Louis, who some months ago recovered a verdict of $100,000 against Mr. Shaw for alleged breach of promise, has had a second trial and comes out minus the hundred thousand dollars, and has a round bill of cost to pay. We fear that Effie’s reputation suffered by the investigations.

— In one of the towns of Connecticut, on the line of the New Haven Railroad, the Republicans took charge of a town pauper, from Friday, paying his board, expenses, &c. They felt so sure of his vote that they gave themselves no further trouble about the vote till Monday, when the voter turned up missing. Upon inquiring in to the absence, they found the pauper in bed ; some of the Democrats had stolen his pantaloons and the vote was lost! On both sides there were many such tricks practiced.

[1] “ADAMS, Charles Francis, (1807 – 1886).” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 – Present. U.S. House of Representatives. Office of Art & Archives, Office of the Clerk. 9 Feb. 2017. <http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000032>
[2] “COL John Quincy Adams, II” Find A Grave. 9 Feb. 2017.
[3] “. Quincy is the birthplace of the second and sixth U.S. Presidents, John Adams and his son, John Quincy Adams …” City of Quincy: About Quincy. Quincy, MA 02169. 9 Feb. 2017.
[4] “… He was offered a promotion to brigadier general in 1847 but refused it when he was elected to the U.S. Senate….” “Jefferson Davis.” Civil War Trust. Copyright © 2014 Civil War Trust. 9 Feb. 2017. <http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/biographies/jefferson-davis.html>; * “In 2006, Dr. R. W. Hertle, a prominent opthamologist at Children’s Hospital in Pittsburg concluded that Davis suffered from “herpes simplex keratouveitis,” (herpes simplex of the eye) a condition that remains a major cause of injury to the eye.” Forum: Jeff Davis was blind in his left eye. CivilWarTalk.com. 10 Feb. 2017. <http://civilwartalk.com/threads/jeff-davis-was-blind-in-his-left-eye.71361/>
[5] “BRIGGS, George Nixon, (1796 – 1861).” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 – Present. U.S. House of Representatives. Office of Art & Archives, Office of the Clerk. 10 Feb. 2017. ; “George N. Briggs.” Wikipedia. 10 Feb. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_N._Briggs#Later_years>
[6] “In 1890, Madison University changed its name to Colgate University in recognition of the family and its gifts to the school.” Colgate University. Wikipedia. 20 Feb. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colgate_University#History>
[7] Eaton, George W. (George Washington), 1804-1872.; “prof. at Hamilton Literary and Theological Institute, Hamilton, N.Y., also called Hamilton Theological Seminary, and pres. when it became Madison Univ.;” Eaton, George W. (George Washington), 1804-1872. Library of Congress Authorities. The Library of Congress. Washington, DC. 10 Feb. 2017. <https://lccn.loc.gov/nr94030643>; Colgate University. An historical sketch of Madison University, Hamilton, N.Y. Utica: D Bennett, Printers, 1852, p. 11. Internet Archives. 10 Feb. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/historicalsketch00colg#page/10/mode/2up/search/eaton>>
[8] “In 1859, Mr. Jere H. Brown, a wealthy planter of Sumter county, who had already been sustaining a dozen or more beneficiaries in the college, made the munificent pledge of $25,000 for the endowment of a second chair of Theology, on condition that the Rev. W. S. Barton raise the remainder of the $100,000 by March 1, 1860.” Garrett, Mitchell B. “Sixty Years of Howard College, 1842 – 1902.” Howard College Bulletin, 85(4), October, 1927, p. 69. Internet Archives. 10 Feb. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/sixtyyearsofhowa00garr#page/68/mode/2up>
[9] “1841 Incorporation. The Alabama Baptist State Convention established a college for men, naming it Howard College in honor of John Howard, an 18th-century English social reformer. ” “History of Samford University. ” Samford University. 11 Feb. 2017. ; Garrett, Mitchell B. “Sixty Years of Howard College, 1842 – 1902.” Howard College Bulletin, 85(4), October, 1927, p. 69. Internet Archives. 11 Feb. 2017. <https://archive.org/stream/sixtyyearsofhowa00garr#page/22/mode/2up/search/%22howard+college%22>; For more information on the residents in Marion, Alabama, specifically at Howard College, see: “1850 Federal Census Perry County, Alabama (Transcriber’s Notes).” Comp. by J. Hugh LeBaron. 2001. The USGenWeb Archives: Perry County, Alabama. Copyright © 1997 – 2017 The USGenWeb Archives Project. 11 Feb 2017.
[10] “Hall proposed marriage on a later visit, having never spoken to this woman before. He was forty-­three years old and possessed an incomparable mind, while she was a servant girl and completely . . . The woman’s name was Elizabeth Smith . . . marriage on March 25, 1808 …” McNutt, Cody Heath. “The Ministry of Robert Hall, Jr.: The Preacher as Theological Exemplar and Cultural Celebrity.” p 49. Dissertation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2012. 10 Feb. 2017.
[11] “of or occurring in the month preceding the present” “Ultimo.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2017
[12] The story was also reported in The New York Times named the defendant, Henry Shaw, Esq., who was described as “a well-preserved and rather comely Englishman of three-score” as well as the plaintiff, Effie Carstang, described as “the plaintiff, and the great protagonist in this drama of real life, is a slim, stately and intelligent-looking lady, on the shady side of thirty” “… Carstang vs. Shaw–Sketch of Parties.” The New York Times. March 10, 1860. © 2017 The New York Times Company. 11 Feb. 2017. <http://www.nytimes.com/1860/03/10/news/affairs-missouri-bates-movement-missouri-opposition-convention-seward-s-speech.html>


Like

Content Roundup – Second Week – February 2017

[1] p., Popular poultry book

[1] p., Popular poultry book

Popular titles prevail this week as a host of newly digitized content is now available. Highlights include: our featured title the “Popular Poultry book” wherein the eternal question “Why did the chicken cross the road?” is answered, a history of Antonio Domenico Pollina – Mafia Boss of Philadelphia, a rare Dime Novel, more story and newspaper issues, and a rare French pamphlet on diplomatic language.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Dusky Dick, or, Old Toby Castor’s great campaign : a story of the last Sioux outbreak / by Jos. E. Badger, Jr.
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:472491]

Non-Fiction

Popular poultry book
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:470008]

Periodicals

The New World (5 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:295256]

Beadle’s Monthly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469741]

Chicago Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 14, Saturday, April 7, 1900

Chicago Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 14, Saturday, April 7, 1900

Chicago Ledger (2 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469972]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:471288]

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 13, June 5, 1858

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 13, June 5, 1858

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:468940]

Historical Society of Montgomery County

National Defender, v. IV, no. 9, Tuesday, October 11, 1859

National Defender, v. IV, no. 9, Tuesday, October 11, 1859

National Defender  ([12 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:465299]

Image Collection

Coloring pages (2 added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:472485]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:472488]

Pennsylvaniana

Typescript. Antonio Domenico Pollina. Mafia Boss of Philadelphia, Notes. 1992
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:471424]

World

"Grande Table",  Langue diplomatique

“Grande Table”, Langue diplomatique

Langue diplomatique
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:472782]


Like

Cap. John Brown

Posted for: Susan Ottignon, Special Collections

National Defende_11_01_1859

National Defender, v. IV, no. 12, Tuesday, November 1, 1859, Whole Number: 169: p. [2].

Annotated and transcribed text from the digitized copy in the Historical Society of Montgomery County Collection.
———————————————————————

CAP. JOHN BROWN

A correspondent of the New York Tribune(1) furnished the following history of the life and character of the leader in the late Insurrenctionary movements at Harper’s Ferry(2) Virginia:

John Brown(3) is an extraordinary man, and although all right minded men must condemn his last mad exploit, there is no reason why justice should not be done him. He was born in New England, which he left at an early age, and has lived most of his life in Ohio and Pennsylvania. He emigrated from Pennsylvania to Kansas, and settled in the Osage country. He was a decided Anti-Slavery mon [sic]– a religious enthusiast, a rigid Presbyterian – correct and conscientious in all his relations and conduct, and modest and unassuming in all his manners. At the same time he was a man of iron will, of untiring energy and of unbounded nerve. All who know him are impressed with the belief that he never knew fear, and that no man ever lived wo [sic] excelled in cool and daring intrepidity. In all his affrays in Kansas he embarked in all the most dangerous and apparently desperate enterprise, and encountered the greatest odds with a cool self-possession and an unbounded confidence in his own success. He was made the object of the most cruel persecutions of the Missourians, and all the bitterness and steep determination of his nature were stirred up from the very depths in retaliation. One of his sons was met alone on the road by a large party of invading Missourians, and cruelly, brutally murdered without a cause. Another son was for no cause but his political opinions, loaded with chains and driven on foot before the horses of his captors from Osawotamie to Tecumseh, under circumstances of cruelty as to destroy, first his reason and next his life. His own house and the house of his son were both fired and destroyed. The women of his family were grossly insulted, and a committee appointed at a public meeting (following the example of the Pro-Slavery men under Emory,(4) who killed and drove out the Free State men of Leavenworth) notified Brown and other Free State men on Potawatamie Creek(5) that if they did not leave the Territory in three days they would be hung. His friends and neighbors were murdered around him ; he was forced into a war of self-defense, and finally a price was publicly set on his head. The effect of these things, in connection with all the other outrage, oppression and murder perpetrated around him, upon a man of Brown’s temperament, may be conceived. He became a fighting man, and developed qualities that excited the admiration and surprise of his friends and made him the terror of his enemies. Though remorseless and relentless as death itself, he did everything under a sense of duty and high religious excitement. The more fervent his prayers, the harder fell his blows, and the more signal and bloody his victories, the more heartily did he return thanks to the Lord after the fight was over.
———————————————————————————-
1 “Horace Greeley founded the New York Tribune in 1841. Greeley took a strong moral tone in his newspaper and campaigned against alcohol, tobacco, gambling, prostitution and capital punishment. However, his main concern was the abolition of slavery and the introduction of universal suffrage.” Simkin, John “New York Tribune.” Spartacus-Educational.com © 1997-2016 Spartacus Educational Publishers Ltd. 4 Feb. 2017. <http://spartacus-educational.com/USAnytribune.htm>
2 For more information on the raid, see: “The raid on Harpers Ferry.” Resource Bank. Africans in America — Judgment Day, 1831-1865: Part 4. WGBH — PBS Online. © 1998, 1999 WGBH Educational Foundation. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2940.html>
3 For more information on John Brown, see: “John Brown.” Resource Bank. Africans in America — Judgment Day, 1831-1865: Part 4. WGBH — PBS Online. © 1998, 1999 WGBH Educational Foundation. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1550.html>
4 Information on Fred. Emory and activities in Leavenworth, see: Napier, Rita G. “Origin Stories and Bleeding Kansas.” Kansas History: A Journal of the Central Plains, 34 Spring 2011: 28–39. 5 Feb. 2017. <https://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/2011spring_napier.pdf>
5 Rein, Chris. “Pottawatomie Massacre.” Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865. The Kansas City Public Library. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.civilwaronthewesternborder.org/encyclopedia/pottawatomie-massacre> ; Etcheson, Nicole. “Bleeding Kansas: From the Kansas-Nebraska Act to Harpers Ferry” Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict, 1854-1865. The Kansas City Public Library. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.civilwaronthewesternborder.org/essay/bleeding-kansas-kansas-nebraska-act-harpers-ferry>

Further Reading:

Malin, James C. “Judge Lecompte and the Sack of Lawrence.” Kansas Historical Quarterly 20(7) 1953, p. 465-494. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.kancoll.org/khq/1953/53_7_malin.htm>

Malin, James C. “Judge Lecompte and the “Sack of Lawrence,” May 21, 1856.” Kansas Historical Quarterly 20(8) 1953, p. 553-597. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.kancoll.org/khq/1953/53_8_malin.htm>

“Territorial Kansas: An Introduction.” Kansas State Historical Society and University of Kansas, Territorial Kansas Online. 5 Feb. 2017. <http://www.territorialkansasonline.org/~imlskto/cgi-bin/index.php?SCREEN=historical_overview>


Like

#ColorOurCollections 2017!

Photo of coloring pages and colored pencils.

Sharpen your pencils & crayons! It’s time for #ColorOurCollections!

This week marks the return of #ColorOurCollections, a social media campaign that presents coloring pages adapted from the collections of cultural heritage institutions. For today, you can find remastered copies of last year’s coloring books in the Digital Library. These coloring books feature the work of Jack B. Yeats, a selection of fantastic beasts, and a selection of covers from the magazine Comfort.

Coloring page from The Bosun & the Bob-tailed Comet.Coloring page with images of dragons.Coloring page of the cover of Comfort magazine, February 1904.

If you color any of our images, be sure to share your masterpieces on social media using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections and tag us so we don’t miss it! You can find our social media profiles in the “About the Collections” section at the bottom left of the Digital Library home page.

Follow the hashtag across social media or check out the website hub at colorourcollections.org to find more coloring pages from cultural heritage institutions around the world! Thank you to the New York Academy of Medicine for organizing another year of #ColorOurCollections!

Happy coloring! :)


Like
1 People Like This Post

Content Roundup – First Week – February 2017

This week we bring to your attention more issues of the National Defender newspaper from 1858, rare Dime Novel and Story Paper issues, and even more signed presidential certificates. A real treasure in the new offerings is the cosmetic creation and beauty guide “How to Become Beautiful”, part of the Ten Cent Handbook series.

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Fiction

Diamond Dick, Jr.’s Fellow Passenger; or, A mail robber tackles the wrong man / by W.B. Lawson
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:471372]

Non-Fiction

How to become beautiful; or, secrets of the toilet and of health
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:468989]

Periodicals

Beadle’s Monthly (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469643]

Selection, cover illustration, Chicago Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 10, Saturday, March 10, 1900

Selection, cover illustration, Chicago Ledger, v. XXVIII, no. 10, Saturday, March 10, 1900

Chicago Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469954]

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 12, May 29, 1858

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 12, May 29, 1858

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:468930]

Historical Society of Montgomery County

National Defender, v. III, no. 9, Tuesday, October 12, 1858, Whole Number: 113

National Defender, v. III, no. 9, Tuesday, October 12, 1858, Whole Number: 113

National Defender (48 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:465299]

Olive Branch (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:449227]

Manuscript Collection

Uncollected manuscripts

Printed. Military Commission Certificate, To: Samuel McConihe, Lieutenant Colonel, Signed: Andrew Johnson, President of the United States and Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War, September 19, 1866
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:471414]

Certificate, New York State Appointment as Counselor to the Chancery, To: Isaac McConihe, January 27, 1823
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:471410]

Villanova Digital Collection

January 25, 2017, "Gloria Naylor"

January 25, 2017, “Gloria Naylor”

Daily Doodles (2017: 1 image added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469294]


Like

Content Roundup – Fourth Week – January 2017

Soldiers' Memorial, Company D, 6th Regiment Infantry, Ohio Volunteers, [n.d.].

Soldiers’ Memorial, Company D, 6th Regiment Infantry, Ohio Volunteers, [n.d.].

This warm January week finds more digitized documents from the American War of Rebellion – as well as more dime novels – story paper issues, more issues of the National Defender in the Historical Society of Montgomery County collection and more Irish folk music from the Philadelphia Ceili Group.

Americana

War of Rebellion

proclam

Broadside, “Proclamation! Headquarters Fourth Division, Murfreesboro,” Signed: Brigadier General William Nelson, July 18, 1862
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469330]

Discharge certificate for Sergeant William F. Bahning signed by Charles B. Russell, June 23, 1864
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469338]

Military Pass, To: Sergt. William F. Bahning, Company D, Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, April 26, 1863
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469342]

Soldiers’ Memorial, Company D, 6th Regiment Infantry, Ohio Volunteers, [n.d.]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469346]

Dime Novel and Popular Literature

Non-Fiction

Book of witty anecdotes
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469990]

Periodicals

Chicago Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469151]

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 11, May 22, 1858

The New York Ledger, v. XIV, no. 11, May 22, 1858

New York Ledger (1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:468920]

Beadle's monthly, February, 1866

Beadle’s monthly, February, 1866

Beadle’s Monthly (index + 1 issue added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469533]
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469545]

Historical Society of Montgomery County

National Defender, v. III, no. 9, Tuesday, October 12, 1858, Whole Number: 113

National Defender, v. III, no. 9, Tuesday, October 12, 1858, Whole Number: 113

National Defender (1858: 10 issues added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Collection/vudl:465299]

Manuscript Collection

Uncollected manuscripts

Printed. Military Commission Certificate, To: Samuel McConihe, Captain, 14th Regiment Signed: Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States and Alphonso Taft, Secretary of War, April 6, 1876
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:469462]

Philadelphia Ceili Group

Spring Concert, April 18, 1982 (3 sets added)
[https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:470692]


Like

Next Page »

 


Last Modified: January 27, 2017